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  1. Those Places Thursday: Lambert Field in St. Louis, MO.

    April 23, 2015 by Pamela M. McMurray

    image_pdfimage_print
    Gerard William Helbling at Lambert Airfield in St. Louis, Missouri. (Click to enlarge.)

    Gerard William “G.W.” Helbling at Lambert Airfield in St. Louis, Missouri, 1931. (Click to enlarge.)

     

    Helbling Family (Click for Family Tree)

    Browsing my files for other photographs for other posts, I came upon this one that I had not really noticed before (more Heritage Ramblings). Anna May Beerbower Helbling was good at keeping photos in albums (lucky us!), and she labeled them well most of the time (even luckier us!). This photo was in an album from 1931.

    Growing up in the northern St. Louis suburbs, Lambert Airfield was an integral part of life. The whole family would load up in the two-tone blue AMC Rambler station wagon, circa 1960?- and head out for the parking area across from the main runway at Lambert. We took popcorn and snacks, and watched the planes come in and fly out, and just talked as a family. As we got older, we didn’t want  to go with family, but instead went with boyfriends…

    The history of the airport is interesting. It began as a launching base for hot air balloons in Kinloch Park. The Wright Brothers visited the field, bringing their aircraft and pilots on tour sometime between 1910-1911. President Theodore Roosevelt was the first president to fly, and he did so from Lambert in 1910. The first experimental parachute jump took place at the Kinloch base. The field was purchased by the Aero Club of St. Louis along with the old Kinloch Racing Track plus 170 cornfield acres, and became the Lambert-St. Louis Flying Field. A passenger terminal and hangars were built after the property was purchased in february 1925 by Albert B. Lambert, for whom the field was named. Lambert was the first St. Louisan to receive a pilot’s license, and a major supporter of Charles Lindbergh.

    Charles Lindbergh played a role in early Lambert Airfield history before his famous flight across the Atlantic- his first job flying was ferrying air mail from Lambert Field. In 1927, Lindbergh had been at Lambert one week before he went to New York to begin his historic flight to Paris. “The Spirit of St. Louis” replica plane that hung in the concourse was always a favorite stop when we would go for a day’s visit to the airport, or to meet family- back then, you could be waiting at the gate for loved ones and watch them walk down the rolling open stairway and cross the tarmac from plane to terminal. That same year as Lindbergh’s historic flight (1927), the airport was sold to the City of St. Louis, and it became the first airport owned by a city in the US. The airport complex included a Naval Air Station (there are lots of pilots in the Navy) which became an active duty base during World War II and a base for manufacturing by McDonnell Aircraft and Curtiss-Wright.

    This is how airplanes of that era looked:

    1929 Fairchild KR-34C

    1929 Fairchild KR-34C at an airshow in 2009. From Wikimedia, CC License.

    G.W. Helbling was a prodigious reader, thinker, tinkerer (he developed a vibrating bed for his wife who suffered from bedsores likely due to diabetes and being bedridden), and man of many interests even though he never received formal education beyond the eighth grade. It is highly probable that he was very interested in flight.  He got married the year after the Wright Brothers completed their first powered flight in 1903, so was old enough to follow the developments of the industry. Knowing him, it is highly likely that he attended the Wright Brothers’ flying exhibition.

    It is wonderful to have at least the caption in the photo album for this picture, but we do so wish there was more information. Had G.W. gone to Lambert sightseeing like his descendants did, or was he out there to pick up a fearless airplane passenger? Was he out there just to watch “those daring young men in their flying machines”? Or maybe even take a flight himself? We probably will never know, but what a treasure we have found in this image!

    The old cars give us a comparison to see the size of the airplane hangars of the day. G. W. died in 1971, so he did see a lot of expansion and changes at Lambert-St. Louis Airport, including the addition of the iconic terminal built in 1953-6.

    Lambert-St. Louis Airport, circa 1960s?

    Lambert-St. Louis Airport, circa 1960s? With kind permission via CardCow.com.

    Below is Lambert airfield in 2010- with its 9,000 ft. runway and redesigned terminals, G.W. wouldn’t recognize it!

    Lambert field from the air

    “Lambert field from the air” by United States Geological Survey – High Resolution Orthoimagery via EROS. 2014. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lambert_field_from_the_air.jpg#/media/File:Lambert_field_from_the_air.jpg

     

    Notes, Sources, and References: 

    1) Additional Lambert-St. Louis images: https://www.google.com/maps/uv?hl=en&pb=!1s0x87df36b4c56388f1:0x9dabcdbc663077a6!2m5!2m2!1i80!2i80!3m1!2i100!3m1!7e1!4shttp://www.panoramio.com/photo/91063151!5slambert+st+louis+airport+terminal+1959+-+Google+Search&sa=X&ei=PnQ2VcrmMvG0sAT814CIAw&ved=0CIcBEKIqMA4

    2) Wikipedia articles:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lambert–St._Louis_International_Airport

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wright_brothers

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wright_Exhibition_Team

    3) CardCow.com- a great resource to buy old postcards, and they generously allow posting of their images with attribution and a link.

     

     

    Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

    We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
     

    Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

    Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
     
    Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
     
    Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.

  2. Wedding Wednesday: Theodore “Dave” Broida and Lucy M. Shatzke, 1916- Addendum

    April 22, 2015 by Pamela M. McMurray

    image_pdfimage_print
    Wedding portrait of Lucy M. Shatzke and Theodore "Dave" Broida, 20 Aug 1916.

    Wedding portrait of Lucy M. Shatzke and Theodore “Dave” Broida, 20 Aug 1916, Aurora, Colorado.

    Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

    We shared the above sweet image in a previous post, but have recently found the Marriage Record Report for this special day:

    Theodore "Dave" Broida and Lucy M. Shatzke Marriage Record Report

    Theodore “Dave” Broida and Lucy M. Shatzke Marriage Record Report, Family Search.org. (See citation below. Click to enlarge.)

     

    Notes, Sources, and References: 

    1) Family treasure chest of photos.

    2) “Colorado Statewide Marriage Index, 1853-2006,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-25803-17277-72?cc=1932434 : accessed 14 April 2015), Brittendall, Herbert L.-Brunk, Leslie F. > image 479 of 4574; State Archives, Denver.

    3) Wedding Wednesday: Theodore “Dave” Broida and Lucy M. Shatzke, 1916, published 01/28/2015 on HeritageRamblings.net: http://heritageramblings.net/2015/01/28/wedding-wednesday-theodore-dave-broida-and-lucy-m-shatzke-1916/

     

    Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

    We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
     

    Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

    Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
     
    Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
     
    Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.

  3. Military Monday: Samuel T. Beerbower- Once a Soldier, Always a Soldier

    April 20, 2015 by Pamela M. McMurray

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    Sketch of Samuel T. Beerbower in "The Marion Daily Star" [Marion OH], 26 Nov 1895

    Sketch of Veteran Samuel T. Beerbower in The Marion Daily Star [Marion OH], 26 Nov 1895, Vol. XIX, No. 3. Page 5. Posted with kind permission.

    Beerbower Family (Click for Family Tree)

    Last week’s “Military Monday: Samuel Taylor Beerbower’s Civil War Service” told of the battle in which Sam was wounded, Mission Ridge near Chattanooga, Tennessee. (AKA Missionary Ridge.) Although honorably discharged due to the paralysis of his right hand and arm, Sam went on to live a long and full life in Marion, Ohio. The Civil War was always remembered, though, and special days, such as 25 November 1863, were always close in mind.

    Sam and a fellow who also served at Mission Ridge got together yearly to celebrate their survival and how the Union forces took what should have been an impregnable Confederate line:

    Samuel T. BEERBOWER- "Sam and Henry"- observation of the anniversary of Mission Ridge_The Marion Daily Star [Marion OH], 26 Nov 1895

    Samuel T. BEERBOWER- “Sam and Henry”- observation of the anniversary of Mission Ridge in The Marion Daily Star [Marion OH], 26 Nov 1895, Vol. XIX, No. 3, Page 5, Columns 3-4. Posted with kind permission.

    It was 32 years later, and the comradeship of the military had once again brought together the men who had endured. (The ‘Encampment’ would have been their G.A.R.- Grand Army of the Republic- post for those who fought in the Civil War.)

    Men with military service were honored by their communities for many years, in many ways.

    The following article uses the word, “caned” in a humorous way, but it was no laughing matter in 1856 when, on the floor of the US Senate, SC Representative Preston Brooks used his gold-headed cane as a weapon to almost kill MA Senator Charles Sumner who had given an anti-slavery speech two days before. It was premeditated and well-planned-Sumner was along in the Senate chamber, writing, when he was assaulted by Brooks whir accompanying Southern state representatives looked on and kept others from intervening. Thankfully the caning was stopped but only after the cane broke into many pieces due to the violence of the attack, and Sumner almost died. Ironically, Brooks hurt himself on one of his backswings to hit Sumner- a metaphor of what would happen with The Civil War, with the South starting it, but ending up being the loser economically, socially, etc. after the war. This horrific caning incident was yet another break in the chain of the Union, leading up to the Civil War.

    Thankfully Sam’s regiment was quite a bit kinder.

    Samuel T. BEERBOWER -"Comrades Vaned Him" in The Marion Daily Star, 10 Nov 1893

    Samuel T. BEERBOWER -“Comrades Caned Him” in The Marion Daily Star [Marion, OH], 10 Nov 1893, Vol. XVI, No. 303, page 5. Posted with kind permission.

     Prior military service brought together people for social reasons as well. Sam’s wife Irene Peters Beerbower was a very active member of the G.A.R. ladies’ section, and held various posts within the group, even elected as an alternative delegate to a larger convention.

    S. T. and Irene PETERS BEERBOWER-GAR Social a "Complete Success" in The Marion Daily Star, 22 Jan 1895, Part 1.

    S. T. and Irene PETERS BEERBOWER-GAR Social a "Complete Success" in The Marion Daily Star, 22 Jan 1895, Part 2.

    S. T. and Irene PETERS BEERBOWER-GAR Social a “Complete Success” in The Marion Daily Star, [Marion, OH], 22 Jan 1895, Vol. XVIII, No. 52, Page 4. Reprinted with kind permission.

     Used to military life, many of the Veterans joined fraternal organizations that had a military sort of organization, uniforms, and even military-like rituals. Sam was a member of the Elks Lodge (and elected Exalted Ruler of Elks in 1873), the Kosciusko Lodge, No. 58 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows (IOOF, another fraternal and service organization) where he served as Noble Grand (N.G.), or presiding officer, in 1883, and his wife participated with the female arm of the IOOF, the Rebekahs. Sam apparently participated with other groups as well:

    Samuel T. BEERBOWER-"Preferred Charges" in The Marion Daily Star," 02 Dec 1893

    Samuel T. BEERBOWER-“Preferred Charges” in The Marion Daily Star,” [Marion, OH] 02 Dec 1893, Vol. XVII, No. 10, Page 8. Posted with kind permission.

    Even in his last months, friendships developed through Sam’s military service and fraternal orders were important:

    Samuel T. BEERBOWER. "The Elks call…" in Marion Daily Sta

    Samuel T. BEERBOWER. “The Elks call…” in The Marion Daily Star [Marion, OH].21 Mar 1902, Vol. XXV, No. 97, Page 5. Posted with kind permission.

    Notes, Sources, and References: 

    1) See citations for each article. The Marion Daily Star is available with a subsription to Ancestry.com.

     

    Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

    We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
     

    Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

    Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
     
    Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
     
    Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.

  4. Sibling Saturday: Joseph Jacob Broida

    April 18, 2015 by Pamela M. McMurray

    image_pdfimage_print
    Joseph Broida, unknown date.

    Joseph Broida, unknown date. (Click to enlarge.)

    Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

    Joseph J. Broida was the oldest surviving son of ten children born to John Broida and Sarah Gitel Frank Broida, both immigrants from Lithuania. Joseph grew up in Pittsburgh, living at various addresses in the 1880s-90s, with his father a merchant at ‘Broida & Yourkansky.’

    In 1900, Joseph is found with his parents and youngest brother in Denver, Colorado, working as a clerk in a clothing house. Joseph was probably with them so that he could help earn a living; the family also had boarders in the home- a husband who was a tailor, his wife, and their two children, with the parents from Russia, as were Joseph’s parents. Joseph’s mother was ill with tuberculosis, and likely they went to Denver hoping for a cure. Sadly that was not to happen, and Gitel died in 1901.

    The family moved back to Pittsburgh, but still were not all together, as some of the boys who had gone to St. Louis (instead of Denver) stayed there after their mother’s death. Joseph and some of his brothers were enumerated in their father’s household in 1910, along with their step-mother. Interestingly, the census also lists Joseph and his wife of 4 years, Fannie Glick, with their 3-1/2 yr old son Gilbert plus his brother Philip, Philip’s new wife Bessie, and brothers Theodore and Louis in Joseph’s household on 15 Apr 1910 at 228 Center Ave. So they were enumerated twice. (There is no date on the enumeration in John’s household.) Joseph was working as a bookkeeper in a wholesale store per the census with him as head of household; he was noted as a machinist in the other 1910 census, which does not seem correct from all the other information known about Joseph.

    In September of 1918, Joseph registered for the World War I draft. He was 36 years old and described as short, medium build, with brown eyes. ‘Color of Hair’ was listed as Bald, Brown. He was a Purchasing Agent for Frank & Seder, a department store in Pittsburgh. (There were family ties to Mr. Frank, as Joseph’s mother Gitel was a Frank.)

    By 1920, Joseph had his wife and two children enumerated with him, plus his sister-in-law Sadie Glick. He was a buyer in a department store, likely Frank & Seder. The household was similar in 1930, with the addition of one more child, son Donald. Sadie Glick still lived with them.

    Joseph Jacob Broida, c1930. Cropped from a family portrait.

    Joseph Jacob Broida, c1930. Cropped from a family portrait.

    When their father John Broida died in Israel in 1938, both Joe and his brother Louis were listed as living at 6306 Forward Ave. in Pittsburgh per the official “Report of death of an American citizen.”

    In the 1940 census, Joseph was listed as divorced. Two of his children, Irene and Donald, were living with him, plus a servant; Gilbert was married and in his own household by 1940. Joe was a purchasing agent in a department store, and daughter Irene worked in a department store as a saleslady. No occupation was listed for 18 year-old Donald, but he probably was in school, as he had completed 2 years of college by then, and he later became an officer in the military, which required a four-year degree. Irene had completed 4 years of high school, and her father had completed 1 year of college, so education was valued in the family.

    Joseph Jacob Broida- WWI Draft Registration Card, Part 1.

    Joseph Jacob Broida- WWI Draft Registration Card, Part 1. (Click to enlarge.)

    The ‘War to end all wars’ did not, and Joe Broida registered for the World War II Draft in 1942. He was 59 years old, still working at Frank & Seder, and living at 6306 Forward Ave. in Pittsburgh, PA. His description stated he was 5’6″ tall, 140 lbs, with gray eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion.

    Joe Broida died on 18 December 1958 in Pittsburgh, PA, at the age of 76, and is buried in Beth Shalom Cemetery in Pittsburgh.

    Joseph Jacob Broida- Obituary

    Joseph Jacob Broida- Obituary.” The Jewish Criterion” Vol. 133, No. 12, Page 20. Posted courtesy of “Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project,” http://digitalcollections.library.cmu.edu/pjn         (Click to enlarge.)

     

     

    Notes, Sources, and References: 

    1) 1900 US Federal Census- Year: 1900; Census Place: Denver, Arapahoe, Colorado; Roll: 120; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 0126; FHL microfilm: 1240122. Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

    2) 1910 US Federal Census, [John] Jacob Broida head of household- Year: 1910; Census Place: East Pittsburgh Ward 3, Allegheny, Pennsylvania; Roll: T624_1293; Page: 21A; Enumeration District: 0064; FHL microfilm: 1375306. Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

    3) 1910 US Federal Census, Joseph J. Broida head of household- Year: 1910; Census Place: Pittsburgh Ward 5, Allegheny, Pennsylvania; Roll: T624_1300; Page: 13B; Enumeration District: 0335; FHL microfilm: 1375313. Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

    4) 1920 US Federal Census, Joseph J. Broida Head of Household- Year: 1920; Census Place: Pittsburgh Ward 13, Allegheny, Pennsylvania; Roll: T625_1522; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 525; Image: 211. Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

    5) 1930 US Federal Census, Joe J. Broida Head of Household- Year: 1930; Census Place: Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania; Roll: 1978; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 0235; Image: 287.0; FHL microfilm: 2341713. Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.

    6) 1940 US Federal Census, Joe J. Broida Head of Household- Year: 1940; Census Place: Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania; Roll: T627_3663; Page: 63A; Enumeration District: 69-403. Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

    7) World War I Draft Registration Card for Joseph Jacob Broida- Registration State: Pennsylvania; Registration County: Allegheny; Roll: 1908758; Draft Board: 10. Ancestry.com. U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

    8) World War II Draft Registration Card for Joseph Jacob Broida- The National Archives at St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri; World War II draft cards (Fourth Registration) for the State of Pennsylvania; State Headquarters: Pennsylvania; Microfilm Series: M1951; Microfilm Roll: 34. Ancestry.com. U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

    9) Most of this information has been posted on the Find A Grave memorial for Joseph Jacob Broida- http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=144823565

    10) Family treasure chest of photos.

     

    Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

    We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
     

    Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

    Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
     
    Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
     
    Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.

  5. Those Places Thursday: Another Denver Colorado Repository

    April 16, 2015 by Pamela M. McMurray

    image_pdfimage_print
    Gilbert Broida in Wrestling Tourney, May, 1935. In "The West End Press", May 3, 1935, (no vol.) No. 64, page 4, column 1. digitaldu.coalliance.org

    Gerald Broida in Wrestling Tourney at 8:20, May 6, 1935. In “The West End Press”, May 3, 1935, (no vol.) No. 64, page 4, column 1. digitaldu.coalliance.org

    Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

    Incredible resources spring up on a daily basis, whether they are just becoming available online or whether they are just now showing up in my search results. A  recent find is the University of Denver’s “Digital DU.”

    Some of our Broida family went to Denver around 1900 (John and Gitel Broida, and their sons Joseph Broida and Harold Broida), then returned to Pittsburgh after Gitel died; Pittsburgh was where many of the family had settled earlier. (See previous posts, including this one about the Broidas in Denver.) A son who had stayed in Pennsylvania with family while his mother was ill, Theodore “Dave” Broida, married in Aurora, CO, in 1916, then lived in the Denver area and raised a family. It was puzzling why Dave moved to Denver, of all places, but the recent repository find gives us some clues. So do recent serendipitous comments when talking with the generations that were closer to the time and people.

    One dear cousin who is an incredible, deep well of Broida information told me this week that Gerald Broida told her years ago that young Jewish boys used to ride the trains west, selling candy to passengers; his father, Dave Broida, was one of them. One day Dave got off the train in Denver, fell in love with the place, and decided to move there. Gerald had also commented that the 1916 wedding of Dave Broida and Lucy Shatzke was the first Jewish wedding in Arapahoe County, Colorado.

    A second conversation that same night with a different family member revived her memories of Dave Broida sending the three sisters a box of 100 pieces of Double Bubble Bubble Gum from Denver occasionally during the war years, when food and candy was rationed. Bubble gum used latex rubber for its chewiness, but rubber and manufacturing facilities were needed more for tires for jeeps and military trucks, gaskets, seals, inflatable vests, etc., so bubble gum was hard to come by in the mid 1940s. The young girls rationed out their sweet treasure of bubble gum from their great-uncle, and no doubt were envied by friends. “Dave and Lucy [Broida] were in the candy business” she said also, and the light bulb went on. Here was more information to corroborate that Dave had been one of the young boys selling candy on a train as they were off to see the world. A rest stop in Denver with the clean air (compared to polluted Pittsburgh) and beautiful mountains even higher than those of Pennsylvania may have made him realize he had found the home for his heart. He would have had knowledge of candy wholesalers to buy his wares for the train, so getting into the candy business later would have been logical.

    In the 1920 US Federal Census, however, Dave was mistranscribed as being a ‘machinist’ but is actually a ‘merchant’ in the furniture business.

    The next US census, in 1930,  lists Theodore D. Broida as a salesman for novelty goods. That could be candy and all those impulse items at the register. A 1940 census entry has not yet been found for the family, but would be very useful. City directories or newspapers might have more information to verify Dave’s occupation, so a Google search was next. The search found The West End Press article above. While about G. Broida being in a wrestling tourney at a weight of 145 pounds (he was 17 then), Gerald Broida was Dave and Lucy’s son. The link led to “Digital DU.”

    There are 633 hits on The West End Press at “Digital DU” but “Broida” does not have any hits, so either the search engine does not go into pages of the newspaper, or else I haven’t figured out how to use the website. (There is an advanced search and even a how-to, but still no Broida results though we know there is at least one mention in the newspaper.) A note to the digital librarian may help, so that is on the agenda. Looking through other areas of the site, however, showed more interesting areas to peruse. There is a “Special Collections and Archives” section that provided more clues to our family story. Apparently Denver, as suspected, was a location that a lot of people with ‘consumption’ (tuberculosis), such as Gitel Broida, moved to, looking for a cure for their disease. It became a problem for Denver to grow so fast, and more sanitariums were founded to serve those who needed medical care. The Digital DU website lists the “Jewish Consumptives Relief Society Records” from the organization founded by Eastern European Jewish men in 1904 (so too late for Broida records), many of whom had the disease themselves. (See image of Patients Undergoing Heliotherapy- likely Gitel Broida underwent the same treatment years earlier.) The Jewish population of Denver was growing and thriving as well, and the Special Collections and Archives contain Jewish artifacts as well as documents.

    This website appears to be worth investigating further, especially how to navigate and search more effectively.

    Searching nearby universities and their digital libraries is a great resource for family historians- otherwise, how would we have known that Gerald Broida weighed 145 lbs. in 1945 and wrestled in a Jewish league?

     

    Notes, Sources, and References: 

    1) 1930 US Federal Census for Joseph Shatzke, head of household- Year: 1920; Census Place: Aurora, Adams, Colorado; Roll: T625_155; Page: 18B; Enumeration District: 8; Image: 207. Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

    2) 1930 US Federal Census for Theodore Broida, head of household- Year: 1930; Census Place: Denver, Denver, Colorado; Roll: 232; Page: 2B; Enumeration District: 0220; Image: 1045.0; FHL microfilm: 2339967. Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.

    3) Jewish Consumptives Relief Society Records – http://digitaldu.coalliance.org/fedora/repository/codu:32554

    Patients undergoing heliotherapy- http://digitaldu.coalliance.org/fedora/repository/codu:60066

    4) Special Collections and Archives- http://digitaldu.coalliance.org/fedora/repository/codu%3A17451

    5) The West End Press article- http://digitaldu.coalliance.org/fedora/repository/codu%3A55006/B121.02.0010.0006.00016_access.pdf/access

    6) Denver University’s Digital DU- http://digitaldu.coalliance.org

     

     

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