Family Recipe Friday: Bess (Green) Broida’s Vegetable Soup

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Bess (Green) Broida’s Vegetable Soup Recipe, from the Broida family News, Volume 1, Number 1, Page 2, Summer 1990, with permission.

Broida Family, Green Family (Click for Family Tree)

Bess (Green) Broida (1891-1978) was the daughter of Abraham M. Green and Rose (Brave) Green. She was a good cook and a number of her recipes are still enjoyed regularly by her descendants.

Bess Dorothy (Green) Broida in Westinghouse Park, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 18 March 1923. Family photo.

The above recipe was published during the summer of 1990 in the first edition of the Broida Family News (BFN). This newsletter was edited by myself, so we will be bringing back some of the BFN articles for our younger generation to enjoy.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Broida Family News, Volume 1, Number 1, Page 2, Summer 1990, self-published.
  2. Photo from family treasure chest.

 

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Original content copyright 2013-2017 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
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Those Places Thursday: Old Hopewell Cemetery and the Roberts-Salyers Family

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Old Hopewell Cemetery in Ripley County, Indiana, via Find A Grave with kind permission of the photographer, JCH1984.

Roberts Family (Click for Family Tree)

Today’s post is a double “Those Places”- first, the cemetery in Ripley Co., Indiana, and secondly, RootsWeb.

Let’s start with RootsWeb. For those fairly new to genealogy, RootsWeb is a website that was one of the best places to find information back in the early days of computers and genealogy. It was a free site, with contributions by members that were lists of cemetery interments, boards for surnames and places, etc. Many people either do not know about it today, or forget that it is there, and search engines do not always find the posts or pages. Of course, the information there always needs to be verified, but sometimes there is old data on RootsWeb that cannot be found anywhere else, or info that is a great clue. Ancestry bought the website when it got too expensive to maintain by volunteers. It is still free for us to use, so please check RootsWeb.Ancestry.com in your research for people, places, and dates.

And I do so appreciate all the volunteer work that went into this site. Many of the folks are gone now but they were very dedicated to free dissemination of genealogical information. (Copyright is held by the person who contributed the information, but facts can be freely used in ways other than copying; make sure to cite your source.) Amazingly, some of the email addresses still work, so give it a try!

OK, now to our other place: Old Hopewell Cemetery in Ripley County, Indiana. The GPS coordinates for the cemetery are 390547N 0851751W, and it is 958 ft. above sea level.

Where this information came from is not noted on the webpage- was it from walking the cemetery and transcribing the stones, or from records kept by the cemetery, church, or other group? It is a secondary source, so errors may have crept in with transcription and publication. So, as always, this information needs to be verified with other sources. Find A Grave is a good resource to use in conjunction with the RootsWeb cemetery listings, but it too is not a primary source, and always needs verification. Of course, doing more research on Ancestry.com or FamilySearch.org for primary source records will help to place the interments in context.

Hopewell Baptist Church-Original Site near cemetery. Posted with kind permission of Find A Grave photographer.

The cemetery is by the original site of the Hopewell Baptist Church, and that is consistent with what we know about the Roberts family as being Baptist while in Indiana. (They may have been Baptist previous to their migration, but we have no evidence thus far to prove that.)

There are some RAYBURNs buried in Old Hopewell, and the Rayburn family married into the Roberts family in Iowa, but that is not a line I have researched.

Sarah (McClure) ROBERTS is the first person of interest in the cemetery listing. No date is given for birth, but her death was 26 Feb 1872. She was the wife of Dr. J. Roberts (Dr. Jeremiah Roberts), and was aged 24 years, 3 months, and 8 days at her death.

Some of the Salyers family is also “quietly resting” in this cemetery. These folks are of interest because our direct ancestor was Jane (SALYERS/SAYLOR) ROBERTS (1806-1880), wife of John S. ROBERTS. We still have not done much research on the Salyers line, and there is still a question as to whether her father’s name was Jeremiah Salyers or John B. Salyers. So we are not sure how these folks fit into the family, but this will be another line to research, and maybe we can verify the name of Jane’s parents if we know her siblings or nieces and nephews. (Of course, these folks may be entirely unrelated, but have the same name- always a possibility.)

William L. Salyers, born 02 Oct 1851, no death date or inscription, appears to be the father of the family interred here.

His wife was Elizabeth __ Salyers, born 04 May 1856 and died 5 Feb 1918.

William’s children were:

Mary Jane Salyers, born 18 Oct 1881 and died 28 Mar 1895, listed as daughter of William & Elizabeth. Mary Jane was  not even 14 years old at her death, and note the name of “Jane” being used.

We do not know the mother of these two children:

Ira Salyers, born 27 Jan 1884, died 16 Jan 1890, just before his sixth birthday. It is noted that he was the son of William.

R. L. Salyers has no birth date given but he died 06 Sep 1890 at just 1 month and 24 days.

Mary J. Salyers is noted as “Mother”, and was born 1858 and died in 1938.  Noting her date of birth, she may have been William’s unmarried sister (was her name possibly Mary Jane?), or his second wife- we do not know when he died, but his first wife Elizabeth passed away in 1918- or even his sister-in-law.

How sad that all three children buried here died at such young ages!

And more clues for more research… Please let us know if you have more information about any of these families.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. RootsWeb page for Old Hopewell Cemetery, Ripley County, Indiana– http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~inripchs/old-hope.html
  2. Old Hopewell Cemetery on Find A Grave– https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/86250/old-hopewell-cemetery?
  3. NOTE: The image of Sarah (Christie) Roberts was removed from this post on 8 Jan 2018 as Jeremiah’s first wife was actually Sarah (McClure) Roberts. A big thank you to cousin Jon Roberts for catching this mistake!
  4. NOTE: Rootsweb is currently down (9 Jan 2018) due to technical problems– please see http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com.

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2017 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
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Shopping Saturday: A Trip to Town in 1906 by the Roberts Family of Jasper County, Iowa- Part 3

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Schoolhouse, Marshall Co., Iowa, via Library of Cogress; Farm Security Administration. This is NOT the schoolhouse near the Roberts homestead, but is very similar. Note “the necessary” out back.

Roberts Family (Click for Family Tree)

Edith ROBERTS continues her story of growing up on the farm in Jasper County, Iowa, and tells us about the actual trip from the farm to town. Together with her father, George A. ROBERTS, her mother, Ella V. (DANIEL) ROBERTS, and her big brother Georgie A. ROBERTS and her older sister Ethel G. ROBERTS, the family made the (weather-permitting) weekly visit to Newton, Iowa into a lovingly remembered event.

“Brother would have driven the skittish team [of horses] to the kitchen door and was having a time holding them in check. We were all ready. Dad had carried out the hot bricks that had been heating in the oven. He wrapped them in many sheets of newspaper, and scattered them in the straw [of the wagon].

Now I had to submit to the indignity of lying on the sitting room floor and be wrapped up in a soft brown shawl. Mother would toss the top of the shawl over my head, and brother … [or] Dad would pick me up like a sack of flour and carry me to the waiting bobsled, If it was Brother, he would jump me unceremoniously into the soft straw. I was so bundled up I could hardly sit upright. I was still squealing; “I can’t see, I can’t see.” so as my mother settled herself into the wagon she took the cover off my face. Sister who was sitting opposite us was already shivering, as she had not put on the sweater mother had told her to. Dad had thrown a lap robe over us. It was from Sears, Roebuck. A plush-like material with a fancy design on one side. How good the warm bricks feel.”

As Edith told her stories, it was obvious that they took her back in time to where she could feel the warm bricks even 60 or 70 years later.

“Brother and dad would be standing up in front. Perhaps on this trip dad would hand the lines, or reins, to brother, and he would proudly turn us around and head straight northeast towards Newton. [They would pass a schoolhouse similar to the one pictured above.]

“If it had snowed enough so that the fences were covered and Skunk River had frozen over, by going directly across the river and fences, we would make better time, and of course the distance was much shorter. The sleigh bells were jangling merrily, as the horses, still feeling their mettle, were really making time. Brother would have to lean back, pulling on the reins to check their speed. Both dad and brother would be wearing fur coats, made from the hides of the beeves [beef cows] we had butchered. Their caps were fur-lined and their long high-cuffed mittens were warm, and make holding on to the reins easier.”

Again, in her writing, Edith seems transported back to that time, making it no longer just the past, but a part of her. She did miss her family, as she outlived her parents and siblings, and the ways of life on the farm were rapidly disappearing.

Edith finished her story:

“The sun was glistening on the hard crusted snow, making millions maybe zillions of flashing diamond like particles on the snow. By this time I was sleepy, and the last I would remember was the cheery sound of the sleigh bells. Mother was so warm and comforting beside me as I went to sleep, and I didn’t know anything until we drove up in front of the grocery store. Mother and sister and I got out while dad and brother took the team of horses to the livery stable to be fed and stabled until time to go home.

“A busy interesting day was ahead of us.”

And so Ellie (DANIEL) ROBERTS would barter her delicious butter, eggs, and other homemade delights at the Newton grocery, and “Shopping Saturday” would begin in earnest for the Roberts family in 1906.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. “A Trip to Town, 1906–Wintertime” by Edith (Roberts) [McMurray] Luck. Written in the 1960s-1970s for her grandchildren.

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2017 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
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Wordless Wednesday: Art in Artifacts

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Eric Madriguera & His Orchestra- “A Man, A Moon, and A Maid,” Side A. This record belonged to Mary (Helbling) McMurray and her husband Edward A. McMurray, Jr.

McMurray Family, Helbling Family (Click for Family Tree)

Eric Madriguera & His Orchestra-“Cuban Yodelin’ Man”, Side B. This record belonged to Mary (Helbling) McMurray and her husband Edward A. McMurray, Jr.

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. This record belonged to Mary (Helbling) McMurray and her husband Edward A. McMurray, Jr. It is a vinyl, 10″, 78 RPM, Picture Disc released in 1947. The genre is Latin music. Wonder if they thought of themselves with Side A- they had just met in 1947 and it was love right away. The “Cuban Yodelin’ Man” is hilarious- not much snow in Cuba! But yodeling was popular at that time in a number of musical genres, including classic country.
  2. This is a perfect example of how technology changes- we don’t have anything to play this on anymore!

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2017 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
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Sentimental Sunday: ‘Parking’ Downtown in Monroe, Jasper County, Iowa in 1896

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Monroe Mirror, [Jasper County, Iowa], 24 December 1896, Vol. 25, No. 9, Page 4, Column 2. (Click to enlarge.)

Roberts Family, Murrell Family (Click for Family Tree)

The day before Christmas was a busy one in Prairie City, Iowa in 1896!

Many of us get sentimental for simpler times, but this article shows that things weren’t that much simpler, just maybe on a smaller scale.

Our Roberts-Murrell ancestors may have been a part of the crowd, looking for a place to hitch their horse and buggy: John Roberts, Elizabeth Ann (Murrell) Roberts, George Anthony Roberts, Ella Viola (Daniel) Roberts, and Edith (Roberts) Luck.

Iowa winters are cold and blustery, and getting in to town on December 24th would have had its challenges:

How to keep warm in the buggy without a button to turn up the heat?

What would the horses eat if the ground is covered with snow and the grass under all dead/dormant?

What if big trees were covered with ice and fell across the road?

Waterways were often used for travel in winter, but how do you know the ice is thick enough to hold a heavy sleigh and team, and then all those gifts one might bring back from town?

Somehow these questions make jockeying for a parking space at the mall seem much easier, and exhausting fingertips on a computer keyboard (or phone) for online ordering almost too easy!

Next week- a description of a trip to town during the winter of 1906, by Edith (Roberts) [McMurray] Luck. Have a Merry Christmas!

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Monroe Mirror, [Jasper County, Iowa], 24 December 1896, Vol. 25, No. 9, Page 4, Column 2.

 

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Original content copyright 2013-2017 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
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