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Sorting Saturday: The Harlan, Roberts, and Murrell Families

The Broad River, near Blacksburg, Cherokee Co., South Carolina, upriver from Union County, SC. Via Wikimedia Commons, public domain.
The Broad River, near Blacksburg, Cherokee Co., South Carolina, upriver from Union County, SC. Via Wikimedia Commons, public domain.

Roberts Family, Murrell Family (Click for Family Tree)

In yesterday’s post, “Friday’s Faces from the Past: The Harlan Family,” we shared pictures of some members of the Harlan family from the late nineteenth to early twentieth century, but do not know how they are related. Today we wanted to mention another, older relationship of the Harlan, Roberts, and Murrell families. These three families were large ones, and they intermarried in various generations; they even migrated together.

Autosomal DNA testing has revealed matches for four members of our family to persons who have Roberts and Murrell matches. Some of these people have in their family tree a David R. Murrell who married Elizabeth Harlan.

According to our research, David was born in Union, the colony of South Carolina, on 25 October 1772. (Some researchers think he was born in Goochland, Virginia.) His parents were Drury Murrell (1743-1801) and Dorcas Rountree/Roundtree (1738-1780). There are DNA matches of our family with the Rountrees as well, lending credence to these family relationships.

Union County, South Carolina, via Wikimedia. The original uploader was Seth Ilys at English Wikipedia - Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2394712
Union County, South Carolina, via Wikimedia. The original uploader was Seth Ilys at English Wikipedia – Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2394712

Elizabeth Harlan was also born in Union, SC, to George “The Hatter” Harlan (1756-1813) and Anna Breed (1755-1815), on 10 August 1778.  George Harlan had been born in, and lived in, Chatham Co., North Carolina, but settled in Union County SC by about 1776 at age 20, where he married Anna and their children were born. (And yes, he made hats, and was a farmer too.)

David R. Murrell and Elizabeth Harlan married on 29 December 1801 in Union County, SC. They had their 11 children in Union, and can be found there in the 1820 US Federal Census. That census lists 2 white males under 10, 1 aged 10-15, 1 aged 16-25, and 1 male over 45, who was probably David. There were three girls under age 10, 2 aged 10-15, and one 26-44, probably Elizabeth. These numbers add up to 8 free white persons under the age of 16 in the household. The household also included 2 male slaves aged 26-44, and one female slave, 14-25, whose name was Jane. Four persons of the household were engaged in agriculture- likely David, his son John Jonas Murrell aged 16-25 (born 1802), and the two male slaves. Two persons were “engaged in manufactures”- that may have been Elizabeth and the female slave, as they may have produced butter, cheese, or textiles and then sold them in town.

The children of David and Elizabeth were: John Jonas Murrell (1802-1847), Nancy Murrell (1804-1888), George Washington Harlan Murrell (1806-1880), Lucinda Murrell (1808-?), Harriet E. Murrell (1810-1874), Densey Murrell (1812-?), Martha Murrell (1814-1873), Joseph Murrell (1816-1868), Drury Murrell (1818-?), Elizabeth Murrell (1819-1860), and David R. Murrell (1821-1822).

David died two years after the census, on 25 May 1822 in Union County; he was only 49. What a difficult time that would have been for Elizabeth, who at his death had nine minor children to raise and support.

Their young son David passed away later that year, on 30 December 1822, not yet two years old.  Elizabeth survived her husband by 26 years, and she did not remarry, since her headstone has her listed as a Murrell, and 70 years old at death.

Are you related to this family? We would be very interested in sharing information, as we would really like to find out more about Wiley Anderson Murrell, our known ancestor, and his ancestors.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. “The Harlan Family,” page 96, in North America Family Histories, 1500-2000, Ancestry.com.
  2. Find a Grave- Elizabeth Harlan Murrell- http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=41381573
  3. Find a Grave- David R. Murrell- http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=41381529
  4. This post has also been published on our “Murrell Family Genealogy: A One-Name Study” blog at http://www.murrellfamilygenealogy.net/2016/04/16/the-harlan-roberts-and-murrell-families

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2016 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright or use of our blog material.

Those Places Thursday: Botetourt County, Virginia

Botetourt County, Virginia- Mountain View

Botetourt County, Virginia- Mountain View

 

Murrell Family (Click for Family Tree)

Botetourt County, Virginia, is the earliest residence that we know of for Wiley Anderson Murrell. He was married there in April of 1834, to Mary Magdalene Honce, also from the area. It can help give us a feel for the context of their lives to know a bit about an area where a family lived.

Map of Virginia with Botetourt County highlighted. Public Domain via Wikipedia.
Map of Virginia with Botetourt County highlighted. Public Domain via Wikipedia.

The eastern edge of Botetourt County follows the Blue Ridge Mountains, and the Appalachian Mountains run along the western. The beautiful James River cuts across the county, between the two mountain ranges.

Botetourt County, Virginia, from an 1895 state map. PD-US, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2790949
Botetourt County, Virginia, from an 1895 state map. PD-US, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2790949

For the Murrell family, it must have been a difficult change to move from the Virginia mountains and valleys to the flat prairie of first Illinois, and later Iowa. The lure of the rich soils of the western lands must have had a stronger pull than that of the mountains.

Botetourt County, Virginia- Valley View.
Botetourt County, Virginia- Valley View.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. 1895 Botetourt map- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Botetourt_County,_Virginia#/media/File:Botetourt_County_Virginia_1895.jpg
  2. Landscape images by Dread Pirate Jeff on FLICKR, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/), only modified size. Thanks, DPJ, for sharing your beautiful images!Mountain image: https://www.flickr.com/photos/justageek/2159754578/in/photolist-4hRiMU-5BqQoC-NSjt-9gkSZr-8Efc8r-6w6gBe-62czZq-ybhxL8-8BheHw-8BhfhE-8k8EV7-cKEjVN-cQD5vb-xdzSvY-pQkEr-4dKp7n-k41k33-xT6Dtn-5joS5b-4hRjbq-8k5tck-g6xtN-pdfVZc-y9H8jq-8k8DuE-8BhfQL-5RExrR-nLHNFo-6w5fyR-8EiaPA-7XoE4A-eifXaC-6ESqom-69BVsT-cQD5Pf-dkn4Ji-eZHjpU-4dKpcn-9VDrK4-dtPxL4-em6JCH-ExRBr5-bE28u9-79t1gk-ybhfw8-pv8Pf6-51zUnK-7Xkt2t-8QtPxN-y8hPa7
    Valley image:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/justageek/2159766380/in/photolist-4hRnio-8Bhf9d-8LV8cU-8AWGDE-7pQ3q5-4dKp9t-rMDBSE-6w9prw-eifWQQ-8Ei7Zb-8Bhfvm-8k8DML-7XAssC-8k5t6Z-69BVtX-q7HHB3-7XxSER-5A9PrR-xSZSrs-cQD3YJ-7Xx8Qi-xdzHSW-8QquCB-dCpfZf-8QA18e-7pLeGk-69BVrg-qQYhBi-xSYKjq-4hRngd-7XoBDb-cQD4js-6w9iqL-fLFzhS-6w9frL-4rQrjQ-4hRmrq-8k8FCG-xSYQCb-8QqGsB-4hMdtM-8Beaig-5WPp5F-dcB5ch-errBNd-6ENgCe-8Be88M-8k5snX-8Be8hp-5WTFoo
  3. This post was also put up on our new blog, MurrellFamilyGenealogy.net. This blog was begun as a one-name study in hope that we might eventually find the parents of Wiley Anderson Murrell.

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2016 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.

Typewriters on Tuesday- Roberts, Daniel(s), Murrell Family History

Roberts-Murrell Family History, 1946. Part 1 of 3.
Roberts-Murrell Family History, 1946. Part 1 of 3. (Click to enlarge.)

Roberts Family, Daniel Family, Murrell Family (Click for Family Tree)

Apparently today, 23 June, is the anniversary of the first typewriter patent. Like all inventions, it would have stood on the work of many before, including an early machine that impressed letters into paper, invented in 1575 by an Italian printmaker.

It is hard to imagine life with only printing presses and the pen- the typewriter made it possible for the average person to easily communicate in a legible fashion. My grandmother had terrible handwriting, so her typewritten letters, with all their mistakes and correction fluid/tape, and the carbon copies, are invaluable. They are especially important since cursive writing is no longer being taught in school, and younger generations cannot really read it sometimes, much less write it.

How many family histories were typewritten, like the above? Some were bound into books or booklets, or just fastened with a staple as the Roberts-Murrell family history in this post. The folks listed in this history are at least 3 generations ago, so some of this information might be lost but for the painstakingly typewritten treasures some of our families are lucky to have today.

My grandmother, her contemporaries, and their ancestors would be so amazed at the leap in communication with today’s word processors and OCR technology.

Roberts-Murrell Family History, 1946. Part 2 of 3.
Roberts-Murrell Family History, 1946. Part 2 of 3. (Click to enlarge.)

The images in this post are a report for the 1946 family reunion of the Roberts family in Jasper County, Iowa. I received it back in the late 1960s, from a Roberts descendant in Newton, Jasper, Iowa. Click on our new “Family Documents” section to download the entire pdf of this file more easily than the images in this post: Roberts, Daniel(s), Murrell Family History, 1946.

Roberts-Murrell Family History, 1946. Part 3 of 3.
Roberts-Murrell Family History, 1946. Part 3 of 3. (Click to enlarge.)

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to have some pictures from that reunion? They are probably out there somewhere… hopefully labeled with names and the date! If any of our dear readers have such pictures, please let us know through a comment on this post or our “Contact Us” form. We would love to share other Roberts, Murrell, Daniel(s), and Blount treasures.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

1) Family treasure chest item received in the 1960s.

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.

George Washington and Our Ancestors

Washington Receiving a Salute after the Victory at Trenton, NJ on 26 dec. 1776. William Holl engraving c1860 after a painting by John Faed. Library of Congress

Washington Receiving a Salute after the Victory at Trenton, NJ on 26 Dec. 1776. William Holl engraving c1860 after a painting by John Faed. Library of Congress. (Click to enlarge.)

McMurray Family, Horn Family

Those of us ‘of an age’ to remember the days when our two greatest presidents were born, and those births celebrated separately, so that one could reflect on the accomplishments of each, know that today is the anniversary of the birth of George Washington.

Back in those days, on February 12th, schoolchildren learned about the horrors of the Civil War and how a lanky farm boy from Illinois held our country together and freed the slaves, and was so eloquent that he could sum up the deep emotions of our citizens in the 10 short sentences of the Gettysburg Address. On February 22nd, schoolchildren listened to the myth of the cherry tree and learned lessons about honesty. That lesson modeled how such a solid, moral foundation could make a middle-born person great enough to help a small group of citizens fight and earn the rights of a democracy, even against the greatest power in the world at the time, Great Britain. Of course, all that learning, reflecting, and honoring individuals ended with the federal government’s “Uniform Monday Holiday Act” that took effect on 1 Jan 1971, and the commemoration of these two great men became a 3-day holiday for bank and federal workers on the third Monday in February. (And don’t forget the commercial President’s Day sales.)

Technically, today is the date George Washington may have celebrated his birth once he was 20 years old, when England changed to the Gregorian calendar. Contemporary records (those created at the time) had dated his birth as 11 February 1731 using the Julian or Old Style (O.S.) calendar. In 1752, England finally came around to the calendar the rest of the world was using, the New Style (N.S.) or Gregorian calendar. This calendar changed the first day of the year to 1 January, instead of 25 March, so any events between those dates had a number of days added- it depended on which year as to how many- plus the year was corrected to the next. So George Washington’s birthday then became 22 February 1732.

I do ramble about our heritage (hence the most appropriate blog name), but there is a reason to mention George Washington when one discusses our family history. We have no proof that a family member met George Washington, but there certainly was opportunity. At least three ancestors may have been in the same place as George Washington at the same time, and, of course, a number had their lives permanently altered because of his actions. These men are Jonathan Benjamin, Henry Horn, and Wiley Anderson Murrell; Washington surely influenced many other ancestors from that time and since. These next few weeks we will be learning more about these men and their families, so stay tuned.

[Is this just name dropping? Hopefully dear reader, you are not thinking that. We are merely interested in putting our ancestors in the context of the times, and knowing ‘famous’ persons would have been a part of that history. It is just as important as a young man fighting a Civil War battle,  a couple taking their friends to the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis as newlyweds (Anna May Beerbower and William Gerard Helbling), a woman casting her first vote in 1921, our generation watching men walk on the moon for the first time, or any relative participating in any big event, or even the mundane ones- all context.]

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

1) Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington’s_Birthday

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.

Travel Tuesday: Migrations to Jasper Co., Iowa

Covered wagon pulled by oxen. Wikimedia Commons.
Covered wagon pulled by oxen. Wikimedia Commons.

McMurray Family, Roberts Family

Ancestors who took up residence in Jasper County, from earliest to latest:

Sylvanus Rufus Benjamin and Sara Ann Palmer in 1865 or 1866 (from Ohio)

Jonathan N. Benjamin and Hannah E. Ford in 1867 (from Ohio)

John S. Roberts and Elizabeth Ann Murrell by 1868 (from Illinois)

Robert Woodson Daniel and Margaret Ann Hemphill by 05 Aug 1870 (from Virginia to Pike Co., Missouri; then to Warren Co., Illinois, thence to Jasper County, Iowa)

Frederick Asbury “F.A.” McMurray and Hannah “Melissa” Benjamin by 1870 (from Pennsylvania to Cedar County, Iowa to Jasper County, Iowa.)

We know the Daniel-Hemphill family came by covered wagon, and the remaining families probably did as well.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

1) Grandma Edie stories and family oral tradition.

2) Census returns, newspaper articles, obituaries, etc.

 

Please contact us if you would like a higher resolution image.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.