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Mystery Monday: Leonard Broida Artwork- Part 2

This entry is part 3 of 7 in the series Leonard L. Broida- Artwork
Fishing Boat by Leonard L. Broida, unknown date. Posted with kind permission of the current owner. (Click to enlarge.)

 

Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

The blog has done one of its intended jobs- it has succeeded at being cousin bait! Our “Mystery Monday: Leonard Broida Artwork” has generated responses from two persons in the Leonard L. Broida line. We  now have some beautiful pictures painted by Leonard to share with you.

The above picture is a watercolor, undated.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Thank you to the cousins who have shared the blog and now their family treasures.
  2. See also “Mystery Monday: Leonard Broida Artwork” at http://heritageramblings.net/2016/04/04/mystery-monday-leonard-broida-artwork/
  3. Above post corrected 4/17/17 to ‘undated’ rather than having been painted in 1970.

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2017 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright or use of our blog material.

Sorting Saturday: Leonard Broida and Anita (Meyer) Broida

Leonard Broida's Carnegie Alumni News update for September, 1964, in the Alumni News, page 7.
Leonard Broida’s Carnegie Alumni News update for September, 1964, in the Alumni News, page 7.

Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

Newspapers are such a wonderful way to learn more about family and the everyday- and special!- activities of their life. Don’t forget to look for a variety of spellings when looking at newspapers, because:

1) Spellings of names were a bit looser in earlier times; and

2) Newspapers use OCR (optical character recognition) software to try to find the words on the page. As newspaper ages and is folded and exposed to light, parts of the letters may fade or be lost and thus be read as a slightly different letter. Hyphenation may also decease your expected ‘hits’ in an OCR search. As an example, a search on “Broida” may not pick up the name if it is hyphenated and a syllable sent to another line, as in

Broi-

da.

Leonard Broida has been harder to find in the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project than anticipated. This may be because sometimes he is listed as “Broido” instead of Broida. There are clues it is the right person, though, as when his wife or other family names are mentioned. But there is also a Broido family living in Pittsburgh during these years. There is a Leonard in that family too, but he is often noted as “J. Leonard Broido.” Not always though, so use the address too as  a clue to help differentiate Leonards.

Max Feldman Obituary, 20 May 1932 Jewish criterion, Vol. 80, No. 2, Page 21, courtesy of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Obituary of Max Feldman, Leonard L. Broida’s step-father.  20 May 1932 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 80, No. 2, Page 21, courtesy of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

Some search engines, like that of the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project, require that one enclose words in a phrase in quotes in order to not get thousands of hits with just one of the words. Remember to try different combinations of a name- going from “Leonard Broida” to “Leonard L. Broida” provided more and different results.

A search for Leonard’s wife Anita using her maiden name picked up a number of additional articles. Don’t forget to try a woman’s name with “Mrs.” in front of it, using her own first name (“Mrs. Anita Broida”) and then again with just the surname (“Mrs. Broida”). “Mrs. Leonard L. Broida” should get picked up also when you search under his name so no need for a separate search. You might even try “Leonard L. and Anita Broida”- making a list of possible search terms and spellings can be quite helpful.

We did leave a few articles for you, dear reader, to find in the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project, but here is one last tidbit related to Leonard and Anita (Meyer) Broida:

Obituary of Sydney Feldman, half-brother of Leonard L. Broida.Jewish Chronicle of Pittsburgh, 15 february 1990, Vol. 29, No. 1, Page 5. Courtesy of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Obituary of Sydney Feldman, half-brother of Leonard L. Broida. Jewish Chronicle of Pittsburgh, 15 february 1990, Vol. 29, No. 1, Page 5. Courtesy of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Citations per captions. With special thanks to the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project for their generous permission to post articles from their digital collection. https://digitalcollections.library.cmu.edu/portal/collections/pjn/index.jsp

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2016 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.

Those Places Thursday: Leonard Broida’s Architecture

The Lorraine Shop, designed by Leonard L. Broida. Article in the 28 June 1929 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 74, No. 28, Page 35, courtesy of the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
The Lorraine Shop, designed by Leonard L. Broida. Article in the 28 June 1929 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 74, No. 28, Page 35, courtesy of the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

Leonard L. Broida (1901-1977) trained as an architect at the Carnegie Institute of Technology, Architecture Class of 1923, and while studying in Europe for one year.

Leonard L. Broida- European Studies. In the Jewish Criterion, 7 December 1923, Vol. 62, No. 6, Page 27, courtesy of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Leonard L. Broida- European Studies. In the Jewish Criterion, 7 December 1923, Vol. 62, No. 6, Page 27, courtesy of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Leonard L. Broida- Returns from European Studies. In the Jewish Criterion, 9 May 1924, Vol. 63, No. 26, Page 26, courtesy of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Leonard L. Broida- Returns from European Studies. In the Jewish Criterion, 9 May 1924, Vol. 63, No. 26, Page 26, courtesy of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

It was not long before he opened an architectural firm with Maurice G. Uslan.

Opening of the architectural firm of Leonard L. Broida and Maurice G. Uslan, in the October 1924 Carnegie Alumnus, page 21, Carnegie Institute of Technology Alumni Federation.
Opening of the architectural firm of Leonard L. Broida and Maurice G. Uslan, in the October 1924 Carnegie Alumnus, page 21, Carnegie Institute of Technology Alumni Federation.
Advertisement for the architectural firm of Leonard L. Broida and Maurice G. Uslan, in the 24 September 1924 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 64, No. 20, Page 175, courtesy of the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Advertisement for the architectural firm of Leonard L. Broida and Maurice G. Uslan, in the 24 September 1924 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 64, No. 20, Page 175, courtesy of the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

Leonard’s designs were definitely influenced by his time abroad, as he describes in this interview that goes along with the image at the top of this post:

The Lorraine Shop, designed by Leonard L. Broida, and interview. Article in the 28 June 1929 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 74, No. 28, Page 35, courtesy of the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
The Lorraine Shop, designed by Leonard L. Broida, and interview. Article in the 28 June 1929 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 74, No. 28, Page 35, courtesy of the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

Leonard took his architect’s vision of modern, timeless beauty, and translated it into economical buildings to grace our city streets for many years.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Sources per citation in captions.

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2016 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.

Wedding Wednesday: Leonard L. Broida and Anita M. Meyer

Leonard L. BROIDA and Anita Mae MEYER- Wedding Announcement, part 1, via 12 February 1926 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 67, No. 14, Page 18, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

1926_0212_BROIDA_Leonard-Anita MEYER_wedding announcement_Jewish Criterion_v67_n14_p19_PJNP
Leonard L. BROIDA and Anita Mae MEYER- Wedding Announcement, part 1, via 12 February 1926 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 67, No. 14, Page 18-19, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

Weddings are a wonderful start for a new family, and can be quite the social event, especially in days gone by. The parties start before♥♥♥

Party for Anita (Meyer) Broida after her marriage. The Jewish Criterion, 5 March 1926, Vol. 67, No. 17, Page 34, via Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project, with their kind permission.
Party for Anita (Meyer) Broida before her marriage. The Jewish Criterion, 5 March 1926, Vol. 67, No. 17, Page 34, via Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project, with their kind permission.

♥♥♥ and a spectacular honeymoon is sometimes in the plans after the special ceremony.

Leonard L. BROIDA and Anita Mae MEYER- Return from Wedding Trip, via 07 May 1926 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 67, No. 26, Page 52, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Leonard L. BROIDA and Anita Mae MEYER- Return from Wedding Trip, via 07 May 1926 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 67, No. 26, Page 52, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

Of course, setting up housekeeping is the next order of the marriage business♥♥♥

Leonard and Anita (Meyer) Broida at home in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. via 25 June 1926 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 68, No. 7, Page 36, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Leonard and Anita (Meyer) Broida at home in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. via 25 June 1926 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 68, No. 7, Page 36, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

And then comes the all-consuming but totally wonderful part of a marriage♥♥♥

Robert Ira Broida born to Leonard L. Broida and Anita (Meyer) Broida; via 30 Aug 1929 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 74, No. 17, Page 16, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Robert Ira Broida born to Leonard L. Broida and Anita (Meyer) Broida; via 30 Aug 1929 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 74, No. 17, Page 16, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Edwin M. Broida born to Leonard L. Broida and Anita (Meyer) Broida; via 27 October 1933 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 82, No. 25, Page 17, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Edwin M. Broida born to Leonard L. Broida and Anita (Meyer) Broida; via 27 October 1933 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 82, No. 25, Page 17, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

Leonard and Anita were married almost 52 years- what a lovely legacy to the Broida family!

PS- If anyone out there has some wedding pictures of Anita and Leonard, we would love to share them through the blog.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. See captions for citations.

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2016 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.

Talented Tuesday: Leonard Broida and the Broida Family Tree

This entry is part 2 of 7 in the series Leonard L. Broida- Artwork
Broida Family Tree, 1954, by Leonard Broida. Family treasure.
Broida Family Tree, 1954, by Leonard Broida. Family treasure. (Click to enlarge.)

Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

Yesterday’s “Mystery Monday: Leonard Broida Artwork” post told some of the story of Leonard and his family, and his beautiful architectural drawings that have recently come back to the family. Today, we are going to share what might be Leonard’s most enduring legacy to family: the Broida Family Tree.

Leonard was very active in the Broida Family and their reunions through the 30s, 40s, and 50s, and served as family historian.

Broida Family Reunion news, Leonard Broida- historian, in announcement in the Jewish Criterion, 09 July 1937, Vol. 90, No. 9, page 14, column 3. Posted with kind permission of the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Broida Family Reunion news, Leonard Broida- historian, in announcement in the Jewish Criterion, 09 July 1937, Vol. 90, No. 9, page 14, column 3. Posted with kind permission of the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

He also served as President, and his wife Anita (Meyer) Broida was the Broida Newsletter editor.

Broida Family Reunion- 1951. Leonard & Anita (Meyer) Broida, officers. The Jewish criterion, Vol. 118, No. 17, Page 12, via Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project, with their kind permission.
Broida Family Reunion- 1951. Leonard & Anita (Meyer) Broida, officers. The Jewish criterion, Vol. 118, No. 17, Page 12, via Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project, with their kind permission.

He spent an unbelievable number of hours and years interviewing and contacting people- in the days before cheap phone calls and the internet- to develop the incredible Broida Family Tree. I wonder how many SASEs he sent out over those years??

1954 Broida Family Tree by Leonard Broida- The deep roots- Pincus Broida.
1954 Broida Family Tree by Leonard Broida- The deep roots- Pincus Broida. (Click to enlarge.)

We are so thankful that Leonard was so dedicated, as he had known the earlier generations, who were children and grandchildren of the earliest documented; they held the memories passed down through the years. So much would have been lost to time without the work of Leonard Broida.

1954 Broida Family Tree by Leonard Broida- The Aria Labe Branch.
1954 Broida Family Tree by Leonard Broida- The Aria Labe Branch. (Click to enlarge.)

The last iteration we have of Leonard’s tree is from 1954, 62 years ago. Two-three more generations have been born since then!

1954 Broida Family Tree by Leonard Broida- The Joseph Branch-1.
1954 Broida Family Tree by Leonard Broida- The Joseph Branch-1. (Click to enlarge.)
1954 Broida Family Tree by Leonard Broida- The Joseph Branch-2, John & Morris branches. (Click to enlarge.)
1954 Broida Family Tree by Leonard Broida- The Joseph Branch-2, John & Morris branches. (Click to enlarge.)
1954 Broida Family Tree by Leonard Broida- The Joseph Branch-3, Michael and Peter Noah branches. (Click to enlarge.)
1954 Broida Family Tree by Leonard Broida- The Joseph Branch-3, Michael and Peter Noah branches. (Click to enlarge.)

We have learned in these days of online records that some of the tree is not quite accurate, and there are some confusing spots that need a bit of work to sort out.

1954 Broida Family Tree by Leonard Broida- The Jacob Branch, Salmon and Mayer. (Click to enlarge.)
1954 Broida Family Tree by Leonard Broida- The Jacob Branch, Salmon and Mayer. (Click to enlarge.)

It doesn’t matter- what a labor of love! Mitch Gooze is the current keeper of the Broida tree, and though his is electronic and thus not quite as decorative, the tree is now up to date as far as we know. I hope that this blog is also a way of keeping the family history alive- how I wish we had recorded interviews and the letters from Leonard’s correspondence! We have so many people who have contributed so much to the knowledge of the Broida family ancestors, and hope that trough the blog, social media, websites like Ancestry.com and Find A grave, we will learn much more.

1954 Broida Family Tree by Leonard Broida- The Minnie and Theodore branches. (Click to enlarge.)
1954 Broida Family Tree by Leonard Broida- The Minnie and Theodore branches. (Click to enlarge.)

I think that Leonard would be proud that the family has carried on his work, and so honored our ancestors.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. SASE= self-addressed, stamped envelope. For our younger generations, old-time genealogy consisted of writing a note with pen and paper or typing it on a manual or electric typewriter, then sending that note in an actual paper envelope. One always included a SASE, since asking for the favor of a reply with information. One would not burden the letter recipient with having to buy an envelope or stamp, nor take the time to address an envelope.
  2. Mystery Monday: Leonard Broida Artwork“-   http://heritageramblings.net/2016/04/04/mystery-monday-leonard-broida-artwork/

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2016 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.