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Wednesday’s Child: The Daniel Children and Family Migration

Crossing the Mississippi on the Ice by C.C.A. Christensen, 1878, via Wikipedia. Public domain. (Click to enlarge.)

Roberts Family, Daniel Family, Murrell Family (Click for Family Tree)

The second oldest son of Charles M. Daniel and Elizabeth (Thomas) Daniel, our ancestor Robert Woodson Daniel, 24, also travelled in a covered wagon to Iowa with his wife, Margaret Ann Hemphill, then 28. They had with them their first child, who was the mother of Edith (Roberts) [McMurray] Luck: Ella V. Daniel. It must have been a challenging trip, as Ella was a toddler of just 2 years.

Margaret bore 4 children after Ella, but three died in infancy.  We know that John W. Daniel was born in 1868, and Charles H. Daniel in 1869- perhaps she was pregnant with one or the other during the trip, or maybe John died as an infant on the way to Iowa. One or both of the children could have gotten an illness from the water, spoiled food, or an infectious disease- we just don’t know the particulars of the trip or anything about the deaths of their children, unfortunately.

Another child was also born to Margaret and Robert, although we do not know the name of that child, nor when she/he died. Burial records for these three children have not yet been found.

It would have been tragic to lose a child while on the road to a better life, but even more heartbreaking if they had needed to bury a child along the road that they might never again travel.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Family records.

 

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Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
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Mappy Monday: The Murrell, Roberts, and Daniel Families

Map of Illinois showing Roseville, the county seat of Warren County, Illinois, via Wikipedia, public domain.

 

Murrell Family, Roberts Family, Daniel Family (Click for Family Tree)

After about 15 years in Illinois, the fertile lands of Iowa (and possibly adventure?) called to our Roberts, Murrell, and Daniel ancestors who had migrated from Virginia originally and were living in Warren County, Illinois in the late 1860s. A possible migration would have been a discussion around a fire or the supper table for many nights. Each of the families had done such a migration once or even twice before, so it may not have been quite as daunting to plan as their first trips. By 1868, the railroad was well established in Iowa and Iowa had been a state for over 20 years, so it was not as if they were moving to a new frontier.

In 1868, John Roberts & Elizabeth Ann (Murrell) Roberts sold off what they could or gave away items, and packed up the rest of their household into a covered wagon. John was 36 years old, Elizabeth 33, and their three sons and one daughter ranged from 5-10 years old; the father of Edith (Roberts) [McMurray] Luck, George Anthony Roberts, was just 7 years old- what an adventure that must have been for a young boy!

Covered wagon pulled by oxen. Wikimedia Commons.
Covered wagon pulled by oxen. Wikimedia Commons.

Elizabeth Ann’s parents, Wiley Anderson Murrell and Mary Magdalene (Honts) Murrell were both 62 in 1868, and all their children were grown. Two of their sons (John Henry Murrell and James Murrell) had moved to Missouri; one, William Anderson Murrell, was married and living in Roseville. Their daughter Ann Elisy Murrell chose to stay in Roseville, and married the next year, in 1869. So Wiley and Mary packed up their household as well, and made the trip of about 175 miles to Iowa with their daughter Elizabeth Ann, her husband John Roberts, and the four grandchildren.

Map showing Jasper County, Iowa, via Wikipedia, public domain.

Edith often told the story (and wrote it down!) that the Daniel family also packed up their worldly goods and family and headed to Iowa that same year, in 1868. She did not know which family arrived in Iowa first, but it is highly likely that they came together in their covered wagons, or one soon after the other. (A big Conestoga wagon could hold the goods of 4-5 families.) Charles M. Daniel was 50 years old, & his wife Elizabeth (Thomas) Daniel was 52. Although they had only been in Illinois for 4-8 years, they too decided to head west. They brought their four youngest children with them, ranging in age from 19-12: John T. Daniel, Mary Daniel, George Wesley Daniel, and Susan Syrena Daniel.  Their oldest son, James W. Daniel, (abt 1842-aft 1910), had stayed in Missouri when they migrated to Illinois in the early 1860s. Another son, Charles M. Daniel (Jr.) (1844-1915) stayed in Warren Co., Illinois and married, then moved to Story County, Iowa (needs to be confirmed) and thence to Madison County, Iowa by 1870. Daughter Nancy J. Daniel (1846-1922) had already married, in 1867, but she and her husband moved to Jasper County, Iowa by 1870, so both Charles and Nancy and their spouses may have travelled with the family group. (Nancy and her husband migrated further west by 1880, to Nebraska.)

Roseman Covered bridge, Madison County, Iowa.
Roseman Covered Bridge, Madison County, Iowa. Wikimedia Commons.

 

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Family stories, Murrell Family Bible, and vital records as found on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org.

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2017 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
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Sentimental Sunday: Elizabeth Ann Murrell and John S. Roberts

1892- John S. Roberts and Elizabeth Ann (Murrell) Roberts, cropped from larger family photo with their descendants. Taken in Jasper County, Iowa. Owned by author.

Roberts Family, Murrell Family (Click for Family Tree)

Once the Wiley Anderson Murrell-Mary Magdalene Honts family settled in Roseville/Warren County, Illinois, their daughter and our ancestor Elizabeth Ann Murrell met a young farmhand named John S. Roberts. He had moved from the family farm of his parents, John Roberts (1805-1875) and Jane Saylor/Salyers (1806-1880), in Indiana, looking for work in the productive grain fields of Illinois. The convergence was fate, as John and Elizabeth married on 8 March 1857 in Roseville, where they set up housekeeping. Elizabeth’s brother John Henry Murrell was living with them in 1860 and working as a farm laborer. Elizabeth had already borne two sons, William Edward Roberts, born in 1858, and Jason Lee Roberts, born in 1859, so it would have been a busy farm household. Their son George Anthony Roberts (the father of Edith Roberts McMurray Luck) was then born in 1861, and finally a daughter, May Jane Roberts, joined the family in 1863, and was also born in Illinois.

We know that the Roberts family had a friendship with a Daniel family in Warren County. Charles M. Daniel (1819-1875) and his wife Elizabeth Thomas (1817-1885) had both been born in Virginia. Elizabeth and then their son, Robert Woodson “R. W.” Daniel (1843-1922), were born specifically in Rockbridge County, Virginia, just north of Botetourt. This family may have known the Murrell or Honts families even as far back as the early 1800s in Virginia, as suggested by some research that still needs more work. The Daniel family, however, decided to migrate to Missouri about 1845 (R.W. was just 2 years old), and then on to Illinois around 1864-1865. Their second migration is understandable, too, by considering the Civil War, as we did for the Murrell family. Being a border state, Missouri was a very dangerous place to live during that conflict. A farmstead could be raided by the Rebs in the morning, and then have Union troops descend that evening, also looking for food, supplies, and “spoils of war.” And then there were the border gangs that took no heed of any allegiance and were themselves committed to violence… It was challenging for a family to survive in Missouri, no matter the side they championed or who was beating on their door.

“R. W.” Daniel  enlisted in the Missouri State Military Cavalry in 1862, and served until 1865. (More on R.W. in the future.) Some sources state that he was in Warren County, Illinois in 1865, but he did marry Margaret Ann Hemphill (1839-1915) on 18 January 1866 in Pike County, Missouri. (He likely knew her from when he lived there, and may have gone to Warren Co. to recuperate from the war after his discharge.) The couple moved about 150 miles north to Young America, Warren County, Illinois, where their first child, Ella Viola Daniel, was born on 29 October 1866.

The John and Elizabeth Roberts family went to visit and congratulate the Daniel family on the birth of their child. John and Elizabeth took their sons and daughters with them for the visit, per their granddaughter, Edith (Roberts) [McMurray] Luck. It was the first time that little George A. Roberts, about to turn five years old, saw his future wife for the very first time.

And that is why this is a “Sentimental Sunday” post!

 

To be continued…

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Vital records such as birth, marriage, and census that can be found on Ancestry.com, FamilySearch, etc.
  2. Family stories written and told by Edith (Roberts) [McMurray] Luck.

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2017 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright or use of our blog material.

Funeral Card Friday: Margaret Ann Hemphill Daniel

1915_1223 Margaret Ann Hemphill Daniel- Obituary. Prairie City News, Prairie City, Iowa, 23 Dec 1915.
1915_1223 Margaret Ann Hemphill Daniel- Obituary. Prairie City News, Prairie City, Iowa, 23 Dec 1915. (Click to enlarge.)

Actually, the title of this post is a misnomer, as we do not have a funeral card for Margaret Ann Hemphill Daniel. We do, however, have an obituary, which is even better. And I wanted this to get posted to the Geneabloggers Pinterest site so am using the prompt, to help others find this information.

The small county of Pike, along the Mississippi River north of St. Louis, must have been a wild and beautiful place in 1839, when Margaret Ann Hemphill was born. Prairie, bluff, and the eternal river that provided food, transportation of crops and goods, as well as people, would have been a part of everyday life for the Hemphill family.

Margaret was the third of ten children of Elizabeth Carson Turner (1811-1882) and David Houston Hemphill (1810-1882). David was a native of South Carolina, and Elizabeth had been born in Illinois, so they may have met during David’s migration or in Missouri. Their first child, Rebecca Jane, was born in Missouri per most references, so they were in Pike County by May of 1836. By 1850, ten year-old Margaret Ann’s father was listed in the US Federal Census as a farmer with $3200 in real estate (more than many adjoining farmers); many others on that census page were from South Carolina too.

In the 1860 US Federal census, Margaret was twenty-one and still living with her parents and siblings. Interestingly, Margaret and her older brother Joseph and younger brother John are listed as having some personal estate: Joseph, a farm laborer, has $140, Margaret noted as a Domestic (like her mother) has $125, and John, also a farm laborer, has $100- could this be an inheritance, as the younger children did not have any values listed? Their father was again listed as a farmer, but with $800 in personal value, nothing listed for real estate.

The Civil War was particularly hard on those who lived in Missouri- it was a border state and sympathies could be found for both sides. Many battles and skirmishes took place in Missouri, and family farms were raided for whatever foods, blankets, and other comforts the troops from either side could grab, leaving less for the citizens of the area.

Meanwhile, Robert Woodson “R.W.” Daniel, a native of Rockbridge County, Virginia who had been born 26 May 1843, had migrated to Pike County with his parents when just two years old. In 1862, he enlisted in Co. C., 3rd Regiment, Missouri State Military Cavalry for a term of 3 years. (More about RW in another post.) Less than a year after being discharged, RW and Margaret married on 16 Jan 1866 in Pike County, Missouri.

Their first daughter, Ella V. Daniel, was born in October of that year.

Soon after their marriage they migrated to Warren County, Illinois, along with his parents, Charles M. Daniel (1819-1875) and Elizabeth Thomas (1817-1885). Their first daughter, Ella V. Daniel, was born in October of that year, in Young America, Warren County, Illinois. Two sons were born: John W. Daniel, in 1868, Charles H. Daniel in 1869, plus another child of unknown sex born about 1870; all three died in infancy.

The family lived in Warren County for about five years, where they met the John S. Roberts family. The Robertses, including John’s wife Elizabeth Ann Murrell Roberts, came to visit after daughter Ella was born, and brought their five year-old son, George A. Roberts (1861-1939). George would marry their daughter Ella V. years later, in 1885.

A number of Warren County families decided to migrate to Jasper County, Iowa, including the Roberts and Daniel families. The Roberts family migrated about 1868; it is unknown if the families migrated together, but RW and Margaret Ann Daniel were in Jasper County by the 05 Aug 1870 US Federal Census.

Margaret had one more child, Lily G. Daniel, in 1872. Lily thankfully survived into adulthood, married, and had two daughters. (Winnie V. Walker, called “Cousin Winnie” by Edith Roberts, and Hilma L. Walker.)

RW and Margaret lived on the farm and worked the land through 1900, and then moved to Des Moines, Iowa, by the 1910 Census. They apparently moved back to Prairie City in 1915, due to Margaret’s illness and need for family to help nurse her. Margaret died 19 Dec 1915 at age 76.

Margaret Ann Hemphill Daniel- illness mentioned in Prairie City News, 23 Dec 1915, Vol. 41, No 52, Page 1, Column 1.
Margaret Ann Hemphill Daniel- illness mentioned in Prairie City News, 23 Dec 1915, Vol. 41, No 52, Page 1, Column 1.

Their daughter Ella V. Daniel Roberts passed away 17 Jan 1922 at the young age of 55. Robert Woodson Daniel died just five months later, on 20 Jun 1922 at age 79.

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Margaret Ann Hemphill Daniel- Obituary. Prairie City News, Prairie City, Iowa, 23 Dec 1915. Volume 41, Number 52, Page 1, Column 1. Original newspaper- the whole paper!- in author’s possession. This scan is from long ago- hence not optimal quality, sorry. I need to put a rescan on my list of Genealogy To-Do items.

2) Beautiful old map of 1836 Missouri, 3 years before Margaret Ann was born: http://www.mapofus.org/_maps/atlas/1836-MO.html

3) Margaret’s obit states that she was a member of the “W.R.C.” This was the ‘Woman’s Relief Corps’ which was a group that was formed to help Civil War veterans and their widows and children.

4) Interestingly, the Missouri marriage records state Margaret’s name as “Mrs. Margaret E. Hemphill.” Entries for other brides, though in a different hand, are very clearly “Miss” so it is unknown if Margaret was previously married to a Hemphill, instead of that being her maiden name, or if it was a clerical error. (Hopefully the latter or a lot of researchers have wrong information.) Margaret A. Hemphill is listed in the family of David H. Hemphill and Elizabeth C. Turner, so hopefully it was just an error. Adding to Genealogy To-Do list…

5) Margaret Ann Hemphill Daniel Find A Grave Memorial #76668654– http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSvcid=210058&GRid=76668654&

6) Hemphill-Daniel Marriage Record- Ancestry.com. Missouri Marriage Records, 1805-2002 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2007. Original data: Missouri Marriage Records. Jefferson City, MO, USA: Missouri State Archives. Microfilm.

 

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Copyright 2013-2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

 
We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post, and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.