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Mystery Monday: Leonard Broida Artwork- Part 5

This entry is part 6 of 7 in the series Leonard L. Broida- Artwork
Leonard L/ Broida’s art, date unknown. (Click to enlarge.)

Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

Leonard L. Broida was a successful architect who trained in the US and studied architecture in Europe; he definitely had artistic talent. For those of a younger generation, all the drawing for buildings was done by hand back then- no CAD software. (!!) A very large piece of paper, pencils, erasers, India ink, and a large, slanted and adjustable drawing table were the tools of an architect’s trade. Sometimes those erasers were electric- imagine having to erase a whole side of the building after the client says it is too small, or they don’t like it that way, or…

Also, an architect would draw renderings by hand- that is, they took the technical drawings such as floorplans and turned them into a beautiful concept drawing of what the building would look like from different vantage points. An architect would sketch in trees and other landscaping, cars, hardscape like sidewalks and parking areas, and maybe even a person walking a dog.

When Leonard and his wife Anita retired to Bird Key in Sarasota, Florida in 1965, Leonard decided he wanted to create fine art instead of technical drawings. So he became an artist, mostly self-taught from books. He worked with a variety of different media including watercolor, oil, ceramic, and copper sculpture.

We are so fortunate to have these family treasures shared with us today!

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Image and information from a Leonard L. Broida descendant.

 

Click to enlarge any image. Please contact us if you would like an image in higher resolution.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2017 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright or use of our blog material.

Sorting Saturday: Leonard Broida and Anita (Meyer) Broida

Leonard Broida's Carnegie Alumni News update for September, 1964, in the Alumni News, page 7.
Leonard Broida’s Carnegie Alumni News update for September, 1964, in the Alumni News, page 7.

Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

Newspapers are such a wonderful way to learn more about family and the everyday- and special!- activities of their life. Don’t forget to look for a variety of spellings when looking at newspapers, because:

1) Spellings of names were a bit looser in earlier times; and

2) Newspapers use OCR (optical character recognition) software to try to find the words on the page. As newspaper ages and is folded and exposed to light, parts of the letters may fade or be lost and thus be read as a slightly different letter. Hyphenation may also decease your expected ‘hits’ in an OCR search. As an example, a search on “Broida” may not pick up the name if it is hyphenated and a syllable sent to another line, as in

Broi-

da.

Leonard Broida has been harder to find in the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project than anticipated. This may be because sometimes he is listed as “Broido” instead of Broida. There are clues it is the right person, though, as when his wife or other family names are mentioned. But there is also a Broido family living in Pittsburgh during these years. There is a Leonard in that family too, but he is often noted as “J. Leonard Broido.” Not always though, so use the address too as  a clue to help differentiate Leonards.

Max Feldman Obituary, 20 May 1932 Jewish criterion, Vol. 80, No. 2, Page 21, courtesy of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Obituary of Max Feldman, Leonard L. Broida’s step-father.  20 May 1932 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 80, No. 2, Page 21, courtesy of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

Some search engines, like that of the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project, require that one enclose words in a phrase in quotes in order to not get thousands of hits with just one of the words. Remember to try different combinations of a name- going from “Leonard Broida” to “Leonard L. Broida” provided more and different results.

A search for Leonard’s wife Anita using her maiden name picked up a number of additional articles. Don’t forget to try a woman’s name with “Mrs.” in front of it, using her own first name (“Mrs. Anita Broida”) and then again with just the surname (“Mrs. Broida”). “Mrs. Leonard L. Broida” should get picked up also when you search under his name so no need for a separate search. You might even try “Leonard L. and Anita Broida”- making a list of possible search terms and spellings can be quite helpful.

We did leave a few articles for you, dear reader, to find in the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project, but here is one last tidbit related to Leonard and Anita (Meyer) Broida:

Obituary of Sydney Feldman, half-brother of Leonard L. Broida.Jewish Chronicle of Pittsburgh, 15 february 1990, Vol. 29, No. 1, Page 5. Courtesy of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Obituary of Sydney Feldman, half-brother of Leonard L. Broida. Jewish Chronicle of Pittsburgh, 15 february 1990, Vol. 29, No. 1, Page 5. Courtesy of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Citations per captions. With special thanks to the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project for their generous permission to post articles from their digital collection. https://digitalcollections.library.cmu.edu/portal/collections/pjn/index.jsp

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2016 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.

Wedding Wednesday: Leonard L. Broida and Anita M. Meyer

Leonard L. BROIDA and Anita Mae MEYER- Wedding Announcement, part 1, via 12 February 1926 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 67, No. 14, Page 18, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

1926_0212_BROIDA_Leonard-Anita MEYER_wedding announcement_Jewish Criterion_v67_n14_p19_PJNP
Leonard L. BROIDA and Anita Mae MEYER- Wedding Announcement, part 1, via 12 February 1926 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 67, No. 14, Page 18-19, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

Weddings are a wonderful start for a new family, and can be quite the social event, especially in days gone by. The parties start before♥♥♥

Party for Anita (Meyer) Broida after her marriage. The Jewish Criterion, 5 March 1926, Vol. 67, No. 17, Page 34, via Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project, with their kind permission.
Party for Anita (Meyer) Broida before her marriage. The Jewish Criterion, 5 March 1926, Vol. 67, No. 17, Page 34, via Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project, with their kind permission.

♥♥♥ and a spectacular honeymoon is sometimes in the plans after the special ceremony.

Leonard L. BROIDA and Anita Mae MEYER- Return from Wedding Trip, via 07 May 1926 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 67, No. 26, Page 52, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Leonard L. BROIDA and Anita Mae MEYER- Return from Wedding Trip, via 07 May 1926 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 67, No. 26, Page 52, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

Of course, setting up housekeeping is the next order of the marriage business♥♥♥

Leonard and Anita (Meyer) Broida at home in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. via 25 June 1926 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 68, No. 7, Page 36, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Leonard and Anita (Meyer) Broida at home in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. via 25 June 1926 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 68, No. 7, Page 36, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

And then comes the all-consuming but totally wonderful part of a marriage♥♥♥

Robert Ira Broida born to Leonard L. Broida and Anita (Meyer) Broida; via 30 Aug 1929 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 74, No. 17, Page 16, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Robert Ira Broida born to Leonard L. Broida and Anita (Meyer) Broida; via 30 Aug 1929 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 74, No. 17, Page 16, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Edwin M. Broida born to Leonard L. Broida and Anita (Meyer) Broida; via 27 October 1933 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 82, No. 25, Page 17, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Edwin M. Broida born to Leonard L. Broida and Anita (Meyer) Broida; via 27 October 1933 Jewish Criterion, Vol. 82, No. 25, Page 17, posted with kind permission of Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

Leonard and Anita were married almost 52 years- what a lovely legacy to the Broida family!

PS- If anyone out there has some wedding pictures of Anita and Leonard, we would love to share them through the blog.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. See captions for citations.

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2016 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.

Mystery Monday: Leonard Broida Artwork- Part 1

This entry is part 1 of 7 in the series Leonard L. Broida- Artwork
Architectural Drawings by Leonard Broida, 1961, framed image. Family treasure.
Architectural Drawings by Leonard Broida, 1961, framed image. Family treasure.

Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

It is fun to write a blog and have a tree on Ancestry.com, memorials on Find A Grave, etc. One never knows what genealogical treasure will be in the email in-box in the morning!

Recently, I had an email from a kind person who had found the above framed drawings in the Salvation Army Thrift Store in Florida City, Florida. She was researching the mystery person who had created them, and wanted to know if this was ‘our’ Leonard Broida. She offered it to us and we were so happy that she had rescued it and was returning it to the Broida family.

Leonard L. Broida- Barns and Wagon, close-up, 1961. Family treasure.
Leonard L. Broida- Barns and Wagon, close-up, 1961. Family treasure.

Leonard L. Broida was the only son of David (Karklinsky) Broida and Esther (Silverberg) Broida. Both his parents were immigrants from Russia/Poland, coming to the US as children. They married most likely in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and the 1900 US Federal Census notes that they had been married one year. They also had their little daughter Minnie Broida (1899-1990, m. to Maurice Kramer), two boarders, and a servant living with them in Pittsburgh’s 11th Ward.

Leonard was born the next year, on 26 Feb 1901 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His sister Minnie was not quite two years old, and his father was most likely still working as a merchant as listed in the 1900 census.

Leonard’s parents divorced in 1908, when he was about 7, per some researchers. The 1904 Pittsburgh City Directory notes Esther “Brodia” as being the widow of David, grocer, with both business and home at 79 Roberts. According to Leonard’s 1923 passport application, his father died in 1912. So when did David Broida actually die? Oftentimes, women would list themselves as ‘widows’ when they were separated from their husband or divorced, since it was such a stigma for a woman to not be married though she had children. We have been unable to find a definitive ‘final resting place’ or any sort of obituary or death certificate for David Broida. There are some sources that could be for him, but nothing that proves they are this same David Broida/Brodia, so more research will be needed to determine the exact situation.

Leonard L. Broida- Trashcan by Building, close-up, 1961. Family treasure.
Leonard L. Broida- Trashcan by Building, close-up, 1961. Family treasure.

Leonard’s mother Esther married second to Max Feldman, and Leonard and Minnie were found with them in the 1910 US Federal Census for Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Esther and Max then had two children together, Sidney Feldman (b. 1913) and Gerald Feldman (b. 1916). The three boys and Minnie grew up in Pittsburgh, and all four children were found with the family in 1920. The 1920 US Federal Census listed the ‘tongue,’ or language spoken by the immigrant parents as “Jewish,” but it also stated that they spoke English. The four children were listed as speaking English as well.

Leonard L. Broida- Arched Window, close-up, 1961. Family treasure.
Leonard L. Broida- Arched Window, close-up, 1961. Family treasure.

Max Feldman, Leonard’s step-father, was a carpenter, so he likely learned some about the construction business from him. Leonard must have known by 1920 what he wanted to do in his life, as he was an apprentice to a “Draughtsman” (or draftsman) as noted in the 1920 US Federal Census for Pittsburgh.

Leonard BROIDA1923 passport picture via Ancestry.com.Leonard applied for a US Passport in 1923, and planned to travel to “France, Italy, Greece, British Isles, Belgium, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, Holland… to study architecture.” He scheduled his passage to leave the port of New York on 13 June 1923, and signed his Oath of Allegiance on the passport application on 2 April 1923.

Just before he got his passport, however, his mother had a surprise for him:

Leonard Broida- surprise party, in the Jewish Criterion, 09 March 1923, Vol. 60, No. 26, page 37, column 3. Posted with kind permission of the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Leonard Broida- surprise party, in the Jewish Criterion, 09 March 1923, Vol. 60, No. 26, page 37, column 3. Posted with kind permission of the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

The ship that carried Leonard to Europe is unknown, but he returned on the “Ausonia,” departing from Liverpool, England. After ten days at sea he arrived back in the states on 15 April 1924, so probably spent a full year in Europe studying the great architecture of the world, and likely some of the commonplace buildings as well. The ship manifest listed Leonard as age 23, single, with his address in the US as 7402 Monticello St., Pittsburgh, PA. (This was the same address listed on his passport application.)

Leonard L. Broida- Arched Doorway, close-up, 1961. Family treasure.
Leonard L. Broida- Arched Doorway, close-up, 1961. Family treasure.

His next year, in the United States, must have had its own excitement. Leonard married Anita Meyer (1904-2008) at Rodef Shalom temple in Pittsburgh on 4 March 1925. The following year, Leonard again travelled to Europe, but this time with his wife Anita.  We do not know when they left or where they travelled, but on their return they sailed on the “Minnekahda” from Boulogne, France, on 17 April 1926, and arrived in New York 10 days later. Their home address was listed as 227 Lehigh Street, Pittsburgh.

Leonard L. Broida- Chimney, close-up, 1961. Family treasure.
Leonard L. Broida- Chimney, close-up, 1961. Family treasure.

Leonard and Anita had a son, Robert Ira Broida, on 25 August 1929 in Pennsylvania, likely Pittsburgh. (Robert d. in 2008.) The family had moved to East Cleveland, Cuyahoga, Ohio by the time of the 1930 US Federal Census, and another son, Edward Roy Broida, was born in the Cleveland area. (1933-2006)

Leonard’s mother, Esther (Silverberg) [Broida] Feldman, had passed away just two months earlier, so sadly did not get to meet her new grandson Edward.

Esther (Silverberg) [Broida] Feldman- Obituary. The Jewish Criterion, Vol. 82, No. 15, Page 15, via Pittsburgh Jewish Newspapers Project with their kind permission.
Esther (Silverberg) [Broida] Feldman- Obituary. The Jewish Criterion, 18 August 1933, Vol. 82, No. 15, Page 15, via Pittsburgh Jewish Newspapers Project with their kind permission.
The 1940 US Federal Census showed the family as living at 3212 Redwood Rd. in Cleveland Heights, Cuyahoga, Ohio, where they had also been living in 1935. (See Note 3 below for image links.) Leonard was listed as an architect who owned his home that was worth $8,000. He was working on his own account, and had worked 48 hours during the previous week, and all 52 weeks of 1939- both important to note as the country was coming out of the Great Depression. Leonard also had income from an additional source, which would have made life a bit easier in those difficult economic years. Anita’s mother, Esther Meyer, and a maid lived with them, as well as sons Robert and Edward.

Leonard had signed up for President Roosevelt’s new “Social Security” program that was signed into law of 14 August 1935. Leonard received his card sometime before 1951 in Ohio.

Leonard L. Broida- Signature, close-up, 1961. Family treasure.
Leonard L. Broida- Signature on his architectural drawing, above, close-up, 1961. Family treasure.

Leonard and Anita escaped the cold winters of Ohio and moved to Sarasota, Florida; they were living there at 363 W. Royal Flamingo Street in 1977. They were in Richmond, Virginia, when Leonard passed away on 9 October 1977. His death certificate states he was to be buried in Palms Memorial Park, Sarasota, Florida.

Leonard and Anita had been married about 52 years at his death. She remained a widow for about three years, then married Sidney Stanley Serck on 20 March 1980 in Sarasota, Florida. She passed away 9 June 2008 in Sarasota.

 

Tomorrow: Leonard Broida’s most enduring legacy to family.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. A special “thank you” to Mitch and Ann, as usual, for their help in determining if this was indeed a Broida artifact, and for their help in learning more about this branch of the family. A big “thank you” also to Katha for rescuing this family treasure and seeking us out to return it.
  2. Since this is a framed image, it was hard to get a good picture or scan, so I apologize. It needs to be reframed with archival materials, but that is on the ‘to-do’ list and I might never get this post up if I wait until then.
  3. Their home at 3212 Redwood St in Cleveland Heights was built in 1920 and is still there- see-
    https://www.google.com/maps/place/3212+Redwood+Rd,+Cleveland+Heights,+OH+44118/@41.50668,-81.5667537,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x8830fc4be5a54739:0xa0f56fe9111b471e

    http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3212-Redwood-Rd_Cleveland-Heights_OH_44118_M41287-17353

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3212-Redwood-Rd-Cleveland-Heights-OH-44118/33661239_zpid/
  4. See images for citations. All censuses are readily available from Ancestry.com, Family Search, etc.
  5. Extracts from this post were used on a Find A Grave Memorial created for Leonard, Memorial #160421885. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=160421885

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2016 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.