Five Family Photos for Friday- The Children of Abraham Green and Rose Brave

image_pdfimage_print
Herman (left) and Mary Green, c. 1896.
Herman (left) and Mary Green, c. 1896.

I didn’t mention the three Green children that were born in America in my post Wedding Wednesday- Abraham Green and Rose Braef or Rose Brave.

Daughter Ann had been born in Lithuania/Poland/Russia in 1885 in Grincasek, Kovnau, Russia, per family oral history. She was about 1 year old when she made the sea voyage to America with her mother who was expecting Estelle. Estelle was born on board ship in 1887.

Bess Dorothy Green was born 24 Jan 1891 in Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, USA. The only son of Abraham and Rose, Herman, was born 1 Sep 1894, also in Pittsburgh. Their baby, Mary Cecelia Green, was born 17 Nov 1895, after they moved to  St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

Rose Green and Family
Rose Green and Family, c1919 probably.

From left, standing in back: Bess (Catlin) Green, wife of Herman Green; Estelle (Green) Ledwidge; Herman Green; Ann (Green) [Stampfer] White; Bess Dorothy (Green)Broida; Rose (Brave) Green.

From left, standing in front: [I believe the names of these sisters are reversed on the back of the photo ID] Sarah “Jane” Ledwidge; Helen D. “Sis” Ledwidge;  Gertrude Broida; Esther Stampfer; and Preston Green, son of Herman Green and Bess Catlin.

Reverse of "Rose Green and Family," c1919 probably.
Reverse of “Rose Green and Family.”
The Green Grandchildren
The Green Grandchildren, possibly c1924.

From left: Gertrude Broida; Preston Green; Helen D. “Sis” Ledwidge behind; in front of her, the toddler Harold Green, son of Herman and Bess (Catlin) Green; Sarah “Jane” Ledwidge; and Esther Stampfer.

Rev of "The Green Grandchildren"
Rev of “The Green Grandchildren”

 

The Green Family, possibly c1924.
The Green Family, possibly c1924.

From left: Esther Stampfer; Charlie P. White, second husband of Ann Green who may be next to him but not visible; Rose (Brave) Green holding her grandson Harold Green; in back, Bess (Catlin) Green; boy in front is Preston Green; behind Preston is Sarah “Jane” Ledwidge; behind Jane may be Mary C. Green, daughter of Rose and Abraham; Estelle “Stelle” (Green) Ledwidge with her hand on her daughter Helen D. “Sis” Ledwidge; Bess Dorothy (Green) Broida behind with her hands on her daughter Gertrude Broida; Herman L. Green.

Reverse of "The Green Family, possibly c1924."
Reverse of “The Green Family, possibly c1924.”

 

Papa Green and Family
Papa Green and Family

From left, standing: Phillip Edwin Broida and his wife, Bess Dorothy (Green) Broida; Rose (Brave) Green and her husband Abraham Green.

From left, sitting: Mary (written on photo and may be Mary C. Green, or Sarah “Jane” Ledwidge?); Helen D. “Sis” Ledwidge, both daughters of Estelle Green and Charles P. Ledwidge; Gertrude Broida, daughter of Phillip and Bessie; and Esther Stampfer, daughter of Ann Green and her first husband Samuel Stampfer.

Reverse of "Papa Green and Family."
Reverse of “Papa Green and Family.”

Please let us know if we have gotten any of these identifications wrong. You may click on any image to enlarge it.

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Family oral and written history.

2) Green Family Photo Album which has some individuals identified.

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images.

Copyright 2013 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

 

 

 

Those Places Thursday- Witebsk, Belarus and The Mother of Abraham Green or Rose (Brave) Green

image_pdfimage_print
Mother of Abraham Green or Rose Brave- name unknown.
Mother of Abraham Green or Rose Brave- name unknown.

One of the cardinal rules of genealogy should be, “Go back and look at everything again. Do it again. And again.” People mention it but we don’t always want to do it- we would rather do the exciting searching and find the big, new, ta-da!

I really should know better, and I really should revisit families every few years. I also really should have learned my lesson after searching for a maiden name for years, and then finding it later in handwritten notes taken while talking with older family members long ago. Oh well, the thrill of discovery was so sweet- at least until I realized I already had that information and could have been researching something else instead.

The above photo is a prime example of why one should revisit data after they have learned more, or just when time has passed and one can see things with a fresh eye. I have had a copy of this image for 30+ years, and occasionally thought about trying to have someone translate the reverse of the photo but didn’t know where I could get that done. Today I was looking at a scan of a family history album that a dear aunt put together, and it hit me- look up the word on the right– “Witebsk”- it is probably a place. Sure enough, it is. And it may have just told us where that branch of the family lived before immigration to the United States.

(Note: Family oral history and the death certificate of Rose Brave state she was born in Kaunas, Lithuania, which is 285 miles from Witebsk; Abraham was also born in Kaunas per oral history/their daughter.)

Mother of Abraham Green or Rose Brave- name unknown.
Reverse of Mother of Abraham Green or Rose Brave- name unknown.

The woman in the photo is probably the mother of either Abraham Green, or his wife, Rose (Brave) Green’s, mother. See my previous post for more information about Abraham Green and Rose Braef: http://heritageramblings.net/2014/01/07/wedding-wednesday-abraham-green-and-rose-braef-or-rose-brave If she is Rose’s mother, her first name may have been Sarah.

The portrait of the woman we suspect was Abraham or Rose’s mother was taken in Witebsk.

Vitebsk Map
Vitebsk Map

Witebsk is the Polish spelling for Vitebsk, one of the oldest Slavonic cities found in the northeastern section of what is today Belarus. It is strategically located at the Zapadnaya Dvina and the Vitba Rivers, and is a crossroad to many trade routes. It had been a part of Lithuania but became a part of Belarus and the Russian Empire in 1772. In 1812, Napoleon battled Russian armies near the walls of Vitebsk- Abraham and Rose’s parents or grandparents may have witnessed those battles.

Map of Europe with Belarus in green. Wikimedia Commons.
Map of Modern Europe with Belarus in green. Wikimedia Commons.

Witebsk and Belarus were centers of European Jewry for much of the 1800s, although the Russian Czars repressed the local Polish culture, and that of the Jews, during that time in a campaign of Russification. By the 1897 Russian Census, about 52% of the Vitebsk population of 65,900 were Jewish ( 34,400 persons). This large percentage of Jews persisted in the region until World War II. Sadly, in 1944 when the city was liberated from the German occupation, only about 118 of the city’s 138,000 inhabitants remained in the city; most of the Jews (possibly 16,000) had been moved to the Vitebsk Ghetto and then massacred in October 1941, possibly including some Green and Braef cousins. Other citizens had been put into concentration or work camps, died during the occupation, etc.

Abraham and Rose chose to emigrate in the mid-1880s, thankfully before the World Wars- was it the draw of freedom of religion, language, speech, assembly, etc. in America that made them undertake such an arduous plan? Was it a poor economy in Witebsk? Was it the parental hope of making life better for their children? Maybe all these played into the tough decision to leave family and friends and move to America.

Vitebsk Town Hall, built 1775. Wikimedia Commons,  GNU Free Documentation License.
Vitebsk Town Hall, built 1775. Wikimedia Commons, GNU Free Documentation License.

The town hall, above, would have been regularly seen by Rose and Abraham as they traveled throughout the city, as would be the Catholic churches below.

Painting by Józef Peszka, Viciebsk,_Rynak._Віцебск,_Рынак_(J._Pieška,_XIX).
Painting by Józef Peszka, Viciebsk,_Rynak._Віцебск,_Рынак_(J._Pieška,_XIX).

 

Marc Chagall (1887-1985), the Jewish artist, is one of the Vitebsk region’s most famous sons.

Today, Vitebsk is a cultural, industrial, and economic center in the region. With over 350,000 residents,  over one-fifth of the region’s industrial output is contributed by Vitebsk, concentrating in mechanical engineering, metal- and wood-working, light and food industries. Science and education are well represented. It is still a crossroads with connections via rail, air, and automobile transport.

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Wikipedia entries and Wikimedia images for Belarus, Vitebsk, Vitebsk Ghetto, Marc Chagall: wikipedia.org.

2) Vitebsk City Executive Committee Offical Site: http://www.vitebsk.gov.by/en/region/history

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images.

Copyright 2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

 

 

Wedding Wednesday- Abraham Green and Rose Braef (or Rose Brave)

image_pdfimage_print
Abraham Green and Rose Braef- Wedding Picture?
Abraham Green and Rose Braef- Wedding Picture?

Green Family (Click to go to family tree.)

Abraham Green (or possibly Abraham Gren) was born in 1866 in Grincasek, Kovnau, Russia, per family oral history, including that of his still-sharp-in-her-90s-daughter Mary C. Green. He and Rose Brave (or Rose Braef) were married about 1884 in Lithuania. The newlyweds decided shortly after that he would emigrate to the United States- how difficult that must have been! The family tells the story that Abraham came to America by himself and established a business as a tailor, then sent for Rose and their daughter Ann, who was just 1 year old by that time. Stelle was born on board ship during migration, and Rose’s mother made the trip as well. We don’t know if she accompanied Rose, had come earlier with Abraham to care for him before Rose arrived, or came on her own, but my thought is that she probably came with her pregnant daughter to care for her as well as her very young grandchild on the long and difficult voyage.

Abraham Green, c 1920s?
Abraham Green, c 1920s?

Abraham had a tailor shop in St. Louis, Missouri, and made very fine suits- it was said that no one in the family could afford an Abraham Green suit! Sadly his business floundered as many others did during the Great Depression, and he passed away on 02 Jul 1931 in St. Louis, Missouri.

Rose (Brave) Green, c1930s?
Rose (Brave) Green, c1930s?

Rose Brave- or ‘Braef’ per her death certificate and family oral tradition- was born in Kaunas, Lithuania, on 15 May 1866. The oral tradition is that her father disappeared somewhere in Europe- perhaps a victim of Russian pogroms? Rose’s mother was elderly and died soon after her immigration to the United States. Rose lived until 03 Jan 1936, when she died at her home in St. Louis, Missouri. She and Abraham have side-by-side stones at Mt. Olive Hebrew Cemetery, now United Hebrew Cemetery, in University City, St. Louis, Missouri.

Headstone of Abraham M. Green 1866-1931 Mt. Olive Hebrew Cemetery, now United Hebrew Cemetery, University City, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Image used with kind permission of FAG photographer.
Headstone of Abraham M. Green 1866-1931
Mt. Olive Hebrew Cemetery, now United Hebrew Cemetery, University City, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Image used with kind permission of FAG photographer.
Headstone of Rose Brave Green 1866-1936,  Mt. Olive Hebrew Cemetery, now United Hebrew Cemetery, University City, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Image used with kind permission of FAG photographer.
Headstone of Rose Brave Green 1866-1936,
Mt. Olive Hebrew Cemetery, now United Hebrew Cemetery, University City, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Image used with kind permission of FAG photographer. 

 

Family headstone of Abraham M. Green and Rose Brave Green. Mt. Olive Hebrew Cemetery, now United Hebrew Cemetery, University City, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Image used with kind permission of FAG photographer.
Family headstone of Abraham M. Green and Rose Brave Green.
Mt. Olive Hebrew Cemetery, now United Hebrew Cemetery, University City, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Image used with kind permission of FAG photographer.

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Family oral history.

2) Findagrave.com for Abraham Green (Memorial #6008372) and Rose (Brave) Green (Memorial #35697089)

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images.

Copyright 2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

 

 

 

 

 

Time Travel Tuesday: Time Traveling into the Future

image_pdfimage_print
1940s Birthday Card- Front
1940s Birthday Card- Front

When we think of time traveling, especially as genealogists, we tend to think of traveling back in time, to the past. This was discussed in a post a couple of weeks ago,  “Where- and When- Will Your Family History Research Take You?” at http://heritageramblings.net/2013/12/10/time-travel-tu…earch-take-you/

Of course, there are also those who look to the future- space travel and life on distant planets intrigues them. Making memories today for those to have in the future is an important part of life, too. As we have children and grandchildren, even great-grandchildren if we are lucky to be here with them, we think about making the time count more and more.

 

Have you ever thought about making memories for others you don’t even know? How about providing them with the means to have memories that will be cherished throughout their future, and a way they can time travel to the early 21st century when they are old and living in a space station revolving around the Earth? The way that I love to do this is by making handmade greeting cards that get sent to our troops overseas. Since there are no Hallmark stores in the mountains of Afghanistan and other remote places our troops serve, these handmade cards are for many occasions- birthday, anniversary, thinking of you, thanks, Christmas, etc. The cards are decorated on the front and are blank or have a sentiment inside, so that our troops can write home to their families on special occasions- or just any day of the week that ends in “y.” 😀  It is a great way for families to keep in touch, but more importantly, a way for them to keep those memories throughout the years- something that cannot easily be done with our electronic communications today. Deployed troops and their family members have written notes to the various organizations and said how much they treasure a love letter from a spouse in these cards, and how fun it is to send a Halloween, Way to Go, Birthday, etc. card to their children back home. (Click the links below to read heartfelt thank yous from our troops.)

1940s Birthday Card- Inside
1940s Birthday Card- Inside

There are a number of groups that collect cards from cardmakers, package them up in boxes with no duplicates and for a variety of occasions, and then send cases overseas to military units around the globe. The cards can be found by our troops in Chaplain’s offices, chow halls, etc.- anyplace they can gather and write a note. One Chaplain even carried them in the many pockets of his fatigues, to hand out to servicemembers he met out in the field. Our troops are able to mail the cards home for free- no stamps needed. Some units even use the cards to give to those deployed on their birthdays!

Probably the biggest group that sends cards to our troops is Operation Write Home (OWH). They have sent over 2.5 million cards since 2007. They also send “AnyHero Mail”- these are cards made or purchased, a note, or even a coloring page by kids, with a ‘thank you’ note written in by folks here at home. “AnyHero Mail” goes to any service member- they are given out to troops who may not receive much mail, or those who need a lift, or just someone passing by who would appreciate a note of thanks for their hard, dangerous, work. “AnyHero Mail” is a great project for schools, companies, church groups, and Scouts. (Our BSA troop really enjoyed it, and some of the boys really got into writing a note to a service member thanking him or her for such unselfish service.)

My favorite group, though, is smaller but still sends a lot of boxes of cards to our military: From Our Hearts in Jefferson City, Missouri. They had sent 380,000 cards overseas by Nov. 4, 2013. They also collect supplies and have a big ‘garage sale’ for crafters, with the proceeds going to pay for mailing supplies, postage, etc.

Please make sure that if you choose to make cards, that you follow the guidelines for each group- it is very important to not use glitter on any mail sent to our troops, because if it gets on their uniforms, the enemy may be able to see them at night. Additionally, strong adhesives are needed because of the heat in the desert,  deadlines must be followed to allow time for the cards to get to the troops and then mailed home before a holiday, no parts of commercial cards may be used, etc.

If you don’t want to make cards but want to help make memories, any of these groups would be very grateful for donations, even very small ones- you know how much postal rates and supplies have increased!

 

Please visit one of the links below, or find a local group that makes cards to send to our troops. Being old enough to remember the horrible way our Vietnam Veterans were treated when they returned to the US, I am so happy to be a part of something that helps to honor our troops and their families, and the sacrifices they all make to protect our precious freedoms and those of people around the world. It is wonderful to be able to time travel into the future, knowing that a card I made with love was sent with love by a service member to family or friend. That card may be stashed in a box of treasured items that will always be held close to heart, for many years, and many generations, to come.

 

1940s Birthday Card- Back
1940s Birthday Card- Back

 

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Operation Write Home: http://operationwritehome.org

2) From Our Hearts: http://www.fromourhearts.info

 

Please contact us if you would like a higher resolution image.

Copyright 2013 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Mystery Monday- I. Rogow, Bernard Rogow, Eva (Krieger) Rogow of Pennsylvania

image_pdfimage_print
A group of Broidas, photo taken in Pittsburgh about 1929-1930.Front row seated. First three ladies were probably Rogow family. (not of the  John Broida tree.) Fourth person unknown. Fifth person is Aunt Lil (Bildhauer) Broida, wife of Louis Broida, Sixth - Aunt (Mumi) Feige - wife to John Broida's brother-unknown which brother, as no record of that name. Seventh - Lucy - David Broida's wife.   Back rwo: Standing - First person - unidentified, Second person, Gertrude Cooper, Third person, Bessie Broida, Fannie Broida (Joseph Broida's wife), Fourth and Fifth person unidentified. (The fourth and fifth person were not from the John Broida family.)
A group of Broidas, photo taken in Pittsburgh about 1929-1930. Front row seated: First three ladies were probably Rogow family (not of the John Broida tree). Fourth person unknown. Fifth person is Aunt Lil (Bildhauer) Broida, wife of Louis Broida. Sixth – Aunt (Mumi) Feige – wife to John Broida’s brother-unknown which brother, as no record of that female name. Seventh – Lucy M. (Shatzke) Broida, (Theodore) David Broida’s wife.
Back row: Standing – First person – unidentified. Second person- Gertrude (Broida) Cooper, Third person, Bessie (Green) Broida, Gertrude’s mother. Fourth person- Fannie (Glick) Broida, Joseph Broida’s wife. Fifth and sixth persons unidentified- not from the John Broida family.

 

One of our readers, and an excellent Broida researcher, asks a question about who the Rogow family is, and how they are related to the Broidas we are researching. Following is an engagement announcement he found in the 27 Jun 1924 issue of The Jewish Criterion from Pittsburgh, PA:

Krieger—Rogow

Mrs. Goldie Krieger, of Shermaiv Avenue, North Side, announces the engagement of her daughter, Eva, to I. Rogow, of New Kensington,Pa.

 

Also, the 30 Sep 1927 issue of The Jewish Criterion states that they have a son named Bernard.

 

Anyone know more about this family and their connection to the Broidas?

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Family oral history.

2) A special thanks to Jim Whitener for his conversations with Gertrude (Broida) Cooper asking her to identify many of these old photos, and for writing it down and sharing.

 

Please contact us if you would like a higher resolution image.

Copyright 2013 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.