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All because two people fell in love… Part 2

This entry is part of 2 in the series All because two people fell in love…
Ed and Mary (Helbling) McMurray, 26 Sep 1948, in Newton, Iowa.

McMurray Family, Roberts Family, Lee Family, Broida Family, Cooper Family (Click for Family Tree)

Three years ago today I posted some images along with lyrics from Brad Paisley’s song, “Two People Fell in Love.” Seemed like that was just not enough pictures of our ancestors who fell in love, so we decided to provide Part 2 and make it a series, as wonderful pictures become available.

Of course, the secret to a good marriage is making every day a day to celebrate your love, not just a day in the midst of February. Our ancestors probably struggled with this concept like we sometimes do, especially when the mundane gotta-dos of life get in the way. Many of them had long, loving marriages though, and they were good role models for their descendants of today.

Please enjoy these lovely people on this Valentine’s Day of 2018 !

1940- from left Ruth Nadine (Alexander) Lee, Henrietta (Fasterling) Reuter, a friend, in center, and Ruth’s husband, Lloyd Eugene “Gene” Lee on right with 1940 Pontiac, license plate from Missouri but image likely taken in Colorado.

 

McMurray-Benjamin Family circa 1886: Frederick Asbury McMurray, Hannah "Melissa" Benjamin McMurray, William Elmer McMurray, Harry J. McMurray, Addie Belle McMurray, Roy McMurray, and Ray McMurray (baby)
McMurray-Benjamin Family circa 1886: Frederick Asbury McMurray, Hannah “Melissa” Benjamin McMurray, William Elmer McMurray, Harry J. McMurray, Addie Belle McMurray, Roy McMurray, and Ray McMurray (baby)

 

1974_02_40th Wedding Anniversary of Gertrude Belle (Broida) Cooper and Irving Israel Cooper.

 

George Anthony Roberts with his wife Ella V. Daniel Roberts and their three children: Ethel Gay Roberts standing in back on left, George Anthony Roberts, Jr. standing on right, and little Edith Mae Roberts between her beloved parents, circa 1904.
George Anthony Roberts with his wife Ella V. Daniel Roberts and their three children: Ethel Gay Roberts standing in back on left, George Anthony Roberts, Jr. standing on right, and little Edith Mae Roberts between her beloved parents, circa 1904.

 

William Anderson Murrell and Cordelia (Talley) Murrell- possibly wedding photo? If so, would have been taken 1 Oct 1867 in Warren Co., IL.

 

John and Gitel (Frank) Broida, c. 1889.

 

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. “All because two people fell in love” HeritageRamblings.net post, 14 Feb 2015– http://heritageramblings.net/2015/02/14/all-because-two-people-fell-in-love/
  2. “Two People Fell in Love,” song by Brad Paisley- see above article for more information.

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2017 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
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Those Places Thursday: J.S. Broida’s 1910 Home in Parkersburg, West Virginia

Home of J. S. Broida, 1318 Avery St., Parkersburg, WV, via GoogleMaps.

Broida Family

It is interesting to see the homes of our ancestors, and today’s technology allows us to do that even when we live far away. (We can even see people renovating the yard!)

Google Maps is the first place that comes up when one enters the address on Google; often additional information will be linked as well. In this case, however, a search for “J. S. Broida Parkersburg WV” came up with the application for the Avery St. Historic District, which described the home, and then Google was the next place to look.

J. S. Broida home in Parkersburg, WV, listed as part of a proposed historic district. National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination Form, OMB No. 1024-0018, page 9.

It is great to see the home and neighborhood being renovated in the GoogleMaps image (in April of 2012), and then to read a bit about the house as it was originally. Not too much has changed on the house as one can see by comparing the description for the neighboring home that was almost identical originally.

The above inventory listing tells us a bit about J.S. Broida, including the name of his partnership. More research could tell us if the oil producer G.E. Gilmore was living next door at the time the Broidas lived at 1318 Avery St.

Other websites like Zillow.com can tell us a bit about the house itself, today. The house has just over 2,000 square feet per Zillow, divided into 4 bedrooms and 2 baths. It may have only had one bath when it was built in 1907, and possibly less square footage, if someone has added on in the ensuing 110 years.

The 1910 US Federal Census lists the family in this home, so they may have been one of the first owners, since it was built in 1907. By 1918, when J.S. registered for the WWI draft, they had moved to 518 Thirteenth St. More research, such as city directories and deeds can help us determine the actual years the family lived in the home.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Google Maps image– https://www.google.com/maps/place/1318+Avery+St,+Parkersburg,+WV+26101/@39.2724381,-81.5513084,3a,75y,102.05h,90t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sUbRZbPNvbBiyyv52ZXUlMQ!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!4m5!3m4!1s0x88484b7a869fe8dd:0xdfbf799c54d99ad5!8m2!3d39.2724039!4d-81.5510757
  2. Avery St Historic District Application– http://www.wvculture.org/shpo/nr/pdf/wood/86000849.pdf
  3. Zillow information– https://www.zillow.com/homes/1318-avery-st-Parkersburg-West-Virginia_rb/

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2017 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
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Tuesday’s Tip: Even Modern Publications May Have Relevant Genealogical Information!

“Broida Building” mentioned in “101 Unique Places to Dine in West Virginia.”

Broida Family

Tuesday’s Tip: Even Modern Publications May Have Relevant Genealogical Information!

Google is good- always amazes me at what a search can find on the astounding internet. A recent search that included the terms Broida, Parkersburg, and WV, found the pamphlet “”101 Unique Places to Dine in West Virginia.” I almost dismissed it as being too modern, but then decided to take a minute to check it out, since Google is seldom (never?) wrong. Sure enough, the Broida Building was listed as the location for a unique food and drink emporium, and it even mentioned that the building was built in the 1920s and housed a store for “fine women’s fashion.” This would have been “Broida’s,” owned by –, and with another store in Parkersburg, West Virginia, about 75 miles west.

Quite an unexpected find in a modern-day flyer!

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. “101 Unique Places to Dine in West Virginia,” via wvcommerce.org.

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2017 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
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Mystery Monday: A Broida from France?

“Honors for Foreign Medical Women” Mlle. Sarah Broida, MD, in The Woman’s Medical Journal, Volume 18, page 209, 1908, via GoogleBooks.

Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

Who is Mlle. Sarah Broida??

Was she a Karklinski-Broida, who had gone to France to get a job? Was she a Broida from the Lithuanian Rabbi line? It would be very interesting to learn more about her life- she probably had some great stories to tell!

How wonderful that she was a doctor in 1908, when there were not that many female doctors.

The Mixte Steamship Company was based in Marseilles, France, and operated between 1855-1981 under various owners.

Mlle. Broida kept good company, at least in the newspapers- note the next paragraph, mentioning Marie Curie! Women were making in-roads, finally, in the sciences.

The last paragraph about Dr. Dontchakova, helps to give us some context. If Dr. Sarah Broida was a Karklinski-Broida, her roots were in Lithuania, often a part of Russia. Where did she go to medical school? Where was she licensed? Apparently she would not have been able to go to school in any of the Russian settlements. Many women doctors of that time period (and men as well) were Doctors of Osteopathy (D.O.s), which was more accepting of women and those who did not choose the path of a formal medical school.

If you know anything of this Sarah Broida, please do share!

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. “Honors for Foreign Medical Women” Mlle. Sarah Broida, MD, in The Woman’s Medical Journal, Volume 18, page 209, 1908, via GoogleBooks.
  2. Compagnie de Navigation Mixte (Shipping company, France)– http://www.crwflags.com/fotw/flags/fr~hfcnm.html

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2017 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
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Workday Wednesday: J.S. Broida’s Clothing Shop in Parkersburg, WV, 1918

1907 ad for Broida & Adams, owned by Jacob S. Broida and C. H. Adams in Parkersburg, West Virginia, via “Parkersburg, 1907, a souvenir of the city of Parkersburg, etc. by W.M. Barnes Directory Co., via Library of Congress.

Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

Jacob S. Broida and his wife, Anna M. Broida, were owners or part-owners of a retail store in Parkersburg, West Virginia, for many years. The store sold “dry goods” which, as Wikipedia describes it, were “products such as textiles, ready-to-wearclothing, and sundries.” (Sundries are personal care items, like soap.)

An example of a dry goods store in West Virgina (NOT the Broida store). Preserved Dry Goods Store on Shenandoah Street in the Lower Town of Harper’s Ferry National Park. Photograph by User:MamaGeek-Joy Schoenberger, 2007, via Wikimedia.

Their store evolved to carry just fine women’s clothing, and they later opened a second store in Clarksburg, West Virginia.

Directory listing for J. S. Broida and Broida & Adams Store, via “Parkersburg, 1907, a souvenir of the city of Parkersburg, etc.,” page 82, by W.M. Barnes Directory Co., via Library of Congress.

In November of 1921, Jacob S.Broida arrived in New York City on a buying trip for his store. We found a list of the products carried at the store:

Buyers Arrive in New York City, including J.S. Broida of Parkersburg, WV. New York Tribune, Nov. 25, 1921, page 17, via Chronicling America at the Library of Congress.

[Note: “Pennsylvania” is listed at the end of his entry but unsure what it means.]

Businesses are required to provide a “Biennial Report” to the state in which they are incorporated, so we learned that Jacob’s store was still in Parkersburg in 1922, sold clothing, and employed two men and nineteen women.

J. S. Broida Clothing Store in 1922, State of West Virginia, Department of Labor, Biennial Report, p. 145, via GoogleBooks.

The Broida store was bought out by Stone & Thomas in 1956. For a short while it was called, “Broida’s, Stone & Thomas” and the chain grew to 19 stores. The stores were sold to Elder-Beerman, Peebles, and Belk in the late 1990s.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. See captions for citations.
  2. “Dry goods” definition and image– https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_goods
  3. Stone & Thomas buyout– https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stone_%26_Thomas

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2017 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright or use of our blog material.

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