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Friday Funny: Banking by Mail

Banking by Mail- American Jewish Outlook, 25 Aug 1950, Vol. 32, No. 17, Page 15. Courtesy of the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.
Banking by Mail- American Jewish Outlook, 25 Aug 1950, Vol. 32, No. 17, Page 15. Courtesy of the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.

I had just deposited a check via the computer I carry in my pocket (my cell phone)- as Nikola Tesla predicted in 1926- and sat down to do a little research. The ‘Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project’ is full of interesting stories and ads, and they are very kind to let us publish the articles from the paper- in fact, they are very pleased that the stories are being made even more accessible and shared!

When I came upon this ad, it struck home since I had just made a deposit in another new-fangled way. Published a bit before I was born, we sure have come a long way from having a long relationship with our tellers and bankers face-to-face. I know that Edith (Roberts) [McMurray] Luck did not trust banking by mail, and much preferred to say hello to a human as she deposited a check. Of course, when Social Security decided to do direct deposit, she had to conform in some respects. She was sad to not have at least held those checks in her hands for a moment. She was also sad that mail banking (and now mobile banking) takes jobs away from our neighbors, and removes another human interaction from our lives. She sure saw a lot of changes in her 83 years, having been born in 1899. I can see her pursed lips and the shaking of her head were she to see how we can view our accounts online on a computer or phone, and how we don’t need to take a passbook in to have it stamped with our deposit amount.

Although at times a Luddite, I will admit that mobile banking sure is a convenience.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Image source as in caption.
  2. “Nikola Tesla’s Incredible Predictions For Our Connected World,” by Matt Novak, 1/06/15, http://paleofuture.gizmodo.com/nikola-teslas-incredible-predictions-for-our-connected-1661107313

 

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Original content copyright 2013-2016 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
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Wedding Wednesday: Joseph and Bess Cooper

Wedding of Joseph Cooper to Bess __, sometime after December 1934. Family photo.
Wedding of Joseph Cooper to Bess __, sometime after December 1934. From left: Gertrude (Broida) Cooper, Joseph’s son Irving I. Cooper (married to Gertrude), Joseph Cooper, his wife Bess ( ___ ) Cooper, his sister Rose Cooper (later married to Ruby Gale), and sister Loretta (Cooper) Ribicoff/Ribakow. Family photo. (Click to enlarge.)

Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

Joseph Baer Cooper (1873-1955) remarried sometime after the death of his first wife, Helen Freda Cooper (1873-1934; Cooper was also her maiden name, as she was his second cousin). Since Helen died 24 December 1834, he most likely remarried in 1935 or later. We have been unable to find a marriage record for Joseph and his second wife, Bess ___- her maiden name is unknown. Marriage records for Pennsylvania have been searched, as Joseph lived there at the death of his first wife, and possibly until at least 02 July 1946, per the obituary of his sister, Lillian (Cooper) Blostein. New York and Florida marriage records have also been searched unsuccessfully, even though they lived in Florida, where Joseph died.

We would really like to know more about Bess (__) Cooper. We know that she survived Joseph, and was living in Miami Beach, Dade, Florida on 21 July 1955 when he died. Joseph was buried beside his first wife in New York. We have been unable to find information about the death of Bess or where she is buried.

Identification of wedding party at marriage of Joseph Cooper to Bess __, sometime after December 1934. Names written by Gertrude Broida Cooper. Family photo.
Identification of wedding party at marriage of Joseph Cooper to Bess __, sometime after December 1934. Names written by Gertrude Broida Cooper. Family photo. (Click to enlarge.)

The above identification of the wedding party/guests was written by Joseph’s daughter-in-law, Gertrude (Broida) Cooper. Note that she wrote the names on the back of the photo, placing them behind the person on the front side. Thus, these names should be reversed when looking at the photo, or read from right to left.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Photo source- family treasure.
  2. Obituary of Lillian Cooper Blostein, Elmira Star Gazette, 02 Jul 1946.

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2016 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted. 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
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Wordless Wednesday: Which Brother is Charles Springsteen, and Which is Thomas Jefferson Springsteen?

Thomas Jefferson Springsteen (or Charles Springsteen) of Indianapolis, Indiana, c1863? Cropped from family portrait.
Thomas Jefferson Springsteen (or Charles Springsteen) of Indianapolis, Indiana, c1863? Cropped from family portrait.

Helbling Family, Springsteen Family (Click for Family Tree)

Charles Springsteen (or Thomas Jefferson Springsteen) of Indianapolis, Indiana, c1863? Cropped from family portrait.
Charles Springsteen (or Thomas Jefferson Springsteen) of Indianapolis, Indiana, c1863? Cropped from family portrait.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. We have been unable to find any family with other pictures of these two to help differentiate them. Four years separate them in age, with Thomas Jefferson Springsteen being the older. We think the young man above that is labeled as Thomas Jefferson is the older, but hard to tell. He used “Thomas” sometimes and “Jeff” others, it seems, so again, hard to pin these folks down.
  2. Charles Springsteen is not found in The History of Buchanan County, Missouri, St. Joseph, Missouri, Union Historical Company, 1881 at https://archive.org/stream/cu31924028846421#page/n7/mode/2up
  3. Charles Springsteen is not found in the History of Rush County, Indiana, from the earliest times to the present, Chicago, Brant & Fuller, 1888. https://archive.org/stream/historyofrushcou00chic#page/n7/mode/2up
  4. Thomas Jefferson Springsteen, sometimes called “Jeff” is not found in the History of Indianapolis and Marion County, Indiana, by B.R. Sulgrove, Philadelphia, 1884. https://archive.org/details/historyofindiana00sulgrich

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
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Sentimental Sunday: Four Generations of Springsteens

Four Generations of Springsteens: Jefferson Springsteen, seated, with his great-grandson William Helbling. Standing on left is Jefferson's daughter Anna Missouri (Springsteen) Beerbower, and her daughter, Anna May (Beerbower) Helbling, mother of little William.
Four Generations of Springsteens: Jefferson Springsteen, seated, with his great-grandson William Francis Helbling. Standing on left is Jefferson’s daughter Anna Missouri (Springsteen) Beerbower, and her daughter, Anna May (Beerbower) Helbling, mother of little William. Taken November, 1906.

Helbling Family, Springsteen Family (Click for Family Tree)

Jefferson Springsteen (1820-1909), married Anna Connor (1824-1887).

Anna Missouri Springsteen (1854-1939) married Edgar Peter Beerbower (1849-1916).

Anna May Beerbower (1881-1954) married William Gerard Helbling (1882-1971).

William Francis Helbling (1906-1907) died at age 15 and one-half months.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Family treasure chest of photos, provided by a dear cousin- thank you!

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2016 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
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