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Sunday’s Obituary: Max Broida, AKA Buster Brodie

Max Broida, AKA Buster Brodie, Obituary from the American Jewish Putlook, vol. 27, no. 21, page 26, columns 1-2, via Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project, Carnegie-Mellon University, with kind permission for non-profit use only.
Max Broida, AKA Buster Brodie, Obituary from the American Jewish Putlook, vol. 27, no. 21, page 26, columns 1-2, via Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project, Carnegie-Mellon University, with kind permission for non-profit use only.

Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

One more obituary for Max Broida, published in his hometown religious newspaper. Note that he was listed as Max (Buster) Brodie, not Broida. His death certificate notes his name as Buster Brodie.

Use the “Search” box to view more obituaries for Max and stories and pictures of his life.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. See image caption.
  2. Buster would have laughed his infectious laugh to see this website about his net worth- http://richestcelebrities.org/richest-actors/buster-brodie-net-worth-2/
  3. “A Doctor’s Diary” from 1937- original Buster post updated with the clip available at  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvLWOxyiah0.

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
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Sorting Saturday: The Frances “Fannie” Isabella (Brown) Chapman Photo Collection

Mrs. J. E. Neville, Colorado
Mrs. J. E. Neville, Colorado. Talbot Photographer, Loveland, Colorado. On the front Mrs. J. E. Neville (very faint pencil); 1900 census shows them in Buckhorn, Colo. James E. born 1858 Penn., Martha E. born 1865 Michigan.

Beerbower Family (Click for Family Tree)

These are the remaining photos in Fannie Chapman’s photo collection. As the owner was sorting through her grandmother’s trunk, she found many images of persons not related, and would like to see them ‘sorted’ into the albums of those who are actually related to these friends of the family and/or students. A. Beerbower (possibly one of our cousins) was in one of the photos in this collection, so he may have also known some of these folks.

Please see previous posts for more about the collection, and contact us if you have an interest in any items in the collection. The owner is eager to find the right homes for these wonderful photos!

Mrs. W. C. Sanderson Eureka Springs, Ark
Mrs. W. C. Sanderson, Eureka Springs, Arkansas.

Mrs. W. C. Sanderson, no info.  The studio is embossed- almost impossible to read but I think it is Gray Brothers in Eureka Springs, Arkansas.

Maggie Richer, New Hampshire
Maggie Richer, New Hampshire

Maggie Richer appears to be the daughter of John C. Richer; he was born in 1844 in New Hampshire.

Eva B. Buchannan Goss
Eva B. (Buchannan) Goss

Eva B. Buchannan was born circa 1874 in Missouri and died 1943. She married William A. Goss who was born 1869 also in Missouri. Her father was John H. Buchannan born 1835 in Iowa, and her mother Mary was born 1844 in Canada.

Minnie Parsons
Minnie Parsons

Alice Parsons Allen
Alice Parsons Allen, Bridge [Photography], Mechanic Falls, Maine
Minnie and Alice were sisters, daughters of Addison B. Parsons.  Minnie was born in 1864 in Maine, and Alice born 1866, Maine.  Alice married Arthur B. Allen.  Written on the back of Alice’s photo: “Mrs. Alice (M.) Parsons Allen died Jan 17, 1898 aged 32 yrs. Mc Falls, Maine.”  Nothing on the back of Minnie’s photo.

Lillias Simpson
Lillias Simpson. Nothing more known about her. Photographer also ‘Talbot, Artist’ in Loveland, Colorado.
Ira Austin
Ira Austin

Ira Austin

Ira Austin was born in 1812 in New York; he was the brother of Clement Austin in Boulder, Colorado.  Ira was listed as a mill planner in the 1880 business pages of Boulder. Written on the back “Ira Austin Boulder, Colorado” – probably a friend of Volney Chapman, father of Verna and Charlotte Chapman.

George Bell Family
George Bell Family

George T. Bell born 1862, Illinois; Minnie (MNU) Bell, born 1866, Nebraska; Maura Bell born 1891, Colorado; Winnie Bell born 1886 in Colorado.  (Data from 1900 census.)

Susie Talbot Knapp and Carrie McDermott
Susie Talbot Knapp and Carrie McDermott

Susie’s picture may interest someone.  She was the sister of Talbot, the Artist/Photographer. Susie Talbot Knapp is identified on the album page.  She looks good for her age born in 1866 I believe.  Carrie McDermott died in 1898 I think if my memory is serving me rightly so the picture had to be taken before then. She was also born ten years or so later than Susie.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Frances “Fannie” Isabella (Brown) Chapman Photo Collection

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
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Friday’s Faces from the Past: The Frances “Fannie” Isabella (Brown) Chapman Photo Collection

mrs. grimes manchester, N.H.
Mrs. Grimes, Manchester, New Hampshire

Beerbower Family (Click for Family Tree)

This post contains more photos from the Frances “Fannie” Isabella (Brown) Chapman Collection. What is known about each person is noted in the caption or paragraph below, excerpted from the owner’s notes to me.

These family treasures are looking for their rightful owners- please see previous posts as well for more information about these images. Contact us if you are interested in these photos!

Chamberlain Family
F. R. Chamberlain Family
Mrs. Chamberlain #3
Mrs. F. R. Chamberlain #3

Mrs. F. R. Chamberlain.  She was a friend of Emma Jane Randall Hollowell and they corresponded regularly.  I have three individual photos of her the youngest it appears taken in St. Augustine, Fla, no studio on the next youngest, Denver (where if I remember correctly most of her letters came from) the older picture and the family picture.

Mertie Weatherstone #2
Mertie Weatherstone #2
Mertie Featherstone #1
Mertie Weatherstone #1

Mertie Weatherstone was born about September, 1879 in Michigan. She married James Allan Taylor late in life, no children I think and I believe I offered these photos, I have two copies of one and the second just one.

Eda N. Peterson
Eda N. Peterson
John S. Peterson
John S. Peterson

Eda N. Peterson and husband John S. Peterson.  She was born in June 1873, in Sweden and married circa 1898. John S. Peterson was born April 1869, also in Sweden.  According to census Eda immigrated in 1893 and John in 1887.  In 1900 they were in Clear Creek, Colorado where he worked gold mines.  Reverse of Eda’s photo states “Rising & Barnhart, Loveland, Colorado.”  Back of John’s is “Artistic Photographer, G. (something like 2.v. maybe Q.v.) Stippler, Longmont, Colorado (maybe Stiffler instead of Stippler).

Eleanor Swanson Benson
Eleanor Swanson Benson

Eleanor Swanson Benson was identified on the album sleeve but have not been able to find anything about her; nothing on back or front to tell what studio.

Mrs. Gifford
Mrs. Gifford?
Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Gifford
Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Gifford

Identified on the back as Mr. and Mrs. A. H Gifford, friends of Emma Jane Randall. They married late and she was older than him.  I think, but am not sure the single is a photo of her in younger days, but nothing is written on the back.

Clara and Edith Gillette
Clara and Edith Gillette
Arthur Gillette
Arthur Gillette

The names and studios are the only thing I know about these Gillettes.  I don’t know if they graduated with Verna or Charlottte, though I think with Charlotte because they were in her album, but she and Verna were of similar age so they knew the same people.  Nothing is on the back of Arthur’s photo, but his name written on the front in pencil.  The names of the girls are written on the back.

(Frances Isabella Brown was born in 1845 in Michigan, the third child of nine born to Lemuel Brown and Catherine Lyman. Fannie trained as a teacher and moved about 1871 to Valmont, Colorado. In 1872 she married Volney Chapman (1823 – 1907). He was one of the original ’49ers but had moved back to his family in Michigan about 1860 only to remove to Colorado after 1870. He and Fannie built a house in Loveland, Colorado which is still standing. They had three children; Lloyd, born 1876, Verna born 1877, and Charlotte born 1879.)

 

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. The Frances “Fannie” Isabella (Brown) Chapman Photo Collection

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.

Thankful Thursday: Thanksgiving Day has New Meaning This Year

Jennie Augusta Brownscombe, The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth, 1914, Pilgrim Hall Museum, Plymouth, Massachusetts. via Wikipedia, public domain.
Jennie Augusta Brownscombe, The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth, 1914, Pilgrim Hall Museum, Plymouth, Massachusetts. via Wikipedia, public domain.

McMurray Family, Burnell Family (Click for Family Tree)

Pilgrims and Puritans always seemed so far removed from everything in life except Thanksgiving dinner- that was my thought in years past. The last few months, however, have revealed a much closer relationship than ever imagined. Some of our Burnell ancestors actually travelled on The Mayflower, though it was her third voyage to the colonies, not that first fateful voyage that gave us the holiday we celebrate today and the famous ‘Plymouth Rock.’ Also, we have quite a lot of Puritans in our Burnell ancestors of New England, and it is fascinating to be learning their stories.

Of course, finding this family heritage meant research into the daily lives of the Puritans. They were not the dour people we often envision. They did allow laughter and play, but everything they did was for the glory of God.

The Puritans wished to purify the English church, and rid it of any facets of Catholicism, such as priests, sacraments, ceremonies, etc. They did have much political power in England after the First English Civil War in 1642-6, but then were unhappy with the limited changes of the Reformation, and many left England. While the Mayflower pilgrims could be classified as being “Separatists” who wanted to start their own churches, likely our ancestors were “non-separating Puritans” since they followed John Winthrop and like-minded others. They did not want to leave the Church of England, but wanted to practice their religion in a more pure way. Thus, although we learned in grade school that the Pilgrims and Puritans came to the colonies for freedom of religion, technically it was so that THEY could practice THEIR religion freely; they would not tolerate others to question nor practice in any way other than that proscribed by the bible as interpreted by their ministers. (They persecuted and even executed heretics and Quakers like Anne Hutchinson.)

The Puritans believed in strict interpretation of the bible, and made their laws, which became the plantation/colony laws, accordingly. Their ultimate goal in this life was to glorify God, in the hope of being with God and an everlasting glory in heaven. They did not believe, like the Catholics, that good works would help one get closer to heaven- the chosen were pre-ordained by God, but they must also live their life orderly and properly in order to fulfill that destiny. Man was made to glorify God while on this earth, in thought, deed, worship, raising children, and even in his business pursuits, they affirmed.

The Puritans believed very strongly in the Fifth Commandment: “Honor thy father and thy mother.” This law produced the strict hierarchy ordering their lives: God was the father of man, who must honor him; man was the ‘father’ to his wife, children, and any servants, thus they would honor him by being subservient and obedient to him. He, as their ‘father,’ was required to see to their education in both religion and practical matters, and it was his duty to see that his family followed the many rules of their society. Because all persons existing at that time were “descendants of Abraham’s seed,” the bible indicated that every person was thus responsible for every other person’s behavior, because all were related. This led to townspeople going to the courts to turn another in for infractions, neighbor against neighbor, but in the spirit of tending to that neighbor’s soul. (Theoretically, of course- some was done as spite as well.) It also led to the guilt and fear of a society such that when something bad happened, like a drought or massacre by the natives- they believed that if they all had done a better job of following the proscribed laws, the bad would not have happened.

Because of their strict interpretation of the bible, the Puritans (as well as members of other religions of the time) felt that Satan was always nearby, ready to take possession of any who were weak or not cautious, not pious. This fear of demons led to a constant fear of anything unexplained. These events were thus considered as Satan’s doing, or his work through possession, or witchcraft.

The Puritans did not can themselves by that name, but felt they were “Congregationalists.” Their congregational church was made up of individuals who had come together voluntarily to worship. Only those who were “visible saints” could join- they had to experience a “conversion” in which the Holy Spirit would come to them. A person desiring admission to the church would have to explain in detail the visit of the Holy Spirit, and church members would be free to accept or reject the applicant. Children were automatically included while they lived in a parent’s household, and sometimes servants as well.  Young children were not brought to church, however- they had to be old enough, “so, as to be benefitted themselves and the Congregation not disturbed by ’em,” per Joseph Belcher. A child would have to experience their own conversion once an adult and out of the household, and apply for membership. Some references stated that our Joseph Parsons and his children had been admitted as church members, but Mary (Bliss) Parsons never did; others stated that she was a church member though regularly accused as a witch. A Puritan church was really made up of families, not individuals.

Education was very important to the Puritans, so that their children could read the bible for themselves. They were not taught to think for themselves, however- only to have the knowledge and understanding of the bible needed to follow the laws to be pious. New England laws proscribed the education of a child- all children, even if it was only a weekly catechism taught by a parent. The town selectmen would go to each home in the plantation (what they called their towns, rather than ‘colonies’ as we call them), and quiz the children on their catechism plus their understanding of it; a parent would be admonished if his children were not properly learning.

Generally both boys and girls attended schools, with some boys moving on to an apprenticeship after learning to read and write, and girls moving to service in various homes in order to learn the skills of housekeeping. Most children were farmed out to other homes in order that they did not become too close to parents, and so that they would learn respect, which might decrease in the teen years if they had stayed with doting parents. Some boys went on to higher education, including Harvard University, which was originally a Puritan institution that mostly produced new ministers for the faith.

While the Puritans did not allow the arts such as drama, they did allow music for the Psalms, but no musical instruments in the church service. They did love their children, although discipline, even very harsh discipline (which was to be a last resort, though that was not always followed), was the duty of a parent or master in order to help ‘save’ the pious life of a child. They loved each other too, within marriage, and were not prudish about sex in the married state; sex outside marriage, however, was severely punished and could be a capital crime. There still exists a very sweet set of correspondence between John Winthrop and his wife, as he was often away. They did take pains, however, to keep their love for each other within bounds, and couch it in terms of their actions glorifying God.

Love was actually desirable in a Puritan marriage. Puritans often married at a slightly older age than many of the time, often mid-20s. All were required to live in a ‘family’ situation by law- no wild singles living on their own without others to see to their soul. Thus children lived with their parents until married, or until a young male was able to afford a household with servants. Sometimes a couple would ‘fall in love,’ but often a person would determine it was time to marry, and then look around at the pool of eligible spouses. Meetings would occur, and if a person thought they could love a person, negotiations were begun. The father of each would negotiate how much they would contribute o the new household, with the groom’s family providing twice as much as the bride’s, in general. Puritans seldom married across class lines, and if all were in agreement at the settlement, the marriage would proceed. Marriage was not a religious ceremony in Puritan society but more a contract, thus the ceremony was performed by a civil magistrate. Unfortunately the words of wedding ceremonies do not exist today- it would be very interesting to know what each spouse promised. Second marriages were left more to the adults to negotiate. It was common to have large blended families since so many spouses died young- often one spouse was marrying for the second, third, or even fourth time, and the other had been married once or more. Women bore children into their forties sometimes, and may have been having children for over a quarter of a century- Mary (Bliss) Parsons, our family’s accused witch, was one of those.

Surprisingly, one can find divorce in Puritan families. Generally divorce was reserved for egregious wrongs- the lack of performing marital ‘duties’ of any kind, whether for physical or willful reasons; abandonment/disappearance (they travelled more than I realized, and may have not made it back from a trip, or just moved on); and sometimes even for verbal or physical abuse .

Understanding Puritan society helps us to understand their lives in a richer deeper, way.

This Thanksgiving Day, thinking of these ancestors and how hard their lives were in the frontier of the New World, yet how they worked to gain glory in each act, will be a part of my reflection of gratitude. Understanding their lives helps us to understand more of our own society and personalities, as well as religions.

There is much more to come about our Puritan and early New England ancestors!

Happy Thanksgiving to all.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. The Puritan Family. Religion & Domestic Relations in Seventeenth Century New England by Edmund S. Morgan, the premier Puritan historian. Harper-Perrenial, 1966 edition.
  2. Wikipedia- Puritans – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puritans

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.

Tuesday’s Tip: Compare Photos Carefully and in Context- The Frances “Fannie” Isabella (Brown) Chapman Photo Collection

Lizzie Speery
Lizzie Speery

Beerbower Family (Click for Family Tree)

Any family historian lucky enough to find a batch of photos is likely to find some in that batch that are not labeled, or have incomplete labels. Sometimes a photo might include just a first name, or a place, or a date- frustratingly often just one of these, or just nothing. After all, the original owner knew who all the people were, so why put names on them??

Tuesday’s Tip: Study each photo individually to glean as much information as possible, but also look at the photo in context with others found with it, and others you may have.

These photos were in the Fannie Belle Brown Chapman Collection. The family believes these were friends and/or schoolmates of Fannie and her sister Ida, and hope that they can find descendants and give them the images. (Contact us if you are related!)

So how does one sort out who is who?

  1. Keep collections or boxes, envelopes, scrapbooks, etc. of photos together; include the negatives if you have them.
  2. Making a scan or taking a picture of them all laid out in the order you received them might be helpful.
  3. If you are scanning a scrapbook, scan each page and number accordingly, then scan individual photos at a higher resolution. This will help keep the images in context.
  4. Label your scans appropriately. Include the name of the collection, side of the family, type of image, and anything you can add to help ID the photo. An example of a file name for the above picture might be:Year_four digit month/day_SPEERY_Lizzie_fm Fannie Belle Brown Chapman Collection_tintypeThis will ‘automagically’ sort your images by date and person; I use individual family folders and when people become adults, they get a new folder with the two names:CHAPMAN_Unknown- BROWN_Fannie BelleI usually put the husband’s name first, as adult records are generally under that name for both of them.
  5. Now that you have familiarized yourself with the collection as you scanned the images, and have a record of their context, look at each image carefully. Look at them in a variety of lights, and tilt them in the light to see if you can find any markings on them- both pencil and ink fade over time, but sometimes the ‘graphite’ of a pencil will glisten if angled just right in the light, or there may be an impression where the writer pressed hard. Enlarge your digital images- sometimes the camera will pick up something your eye did not.
  6. Write down everything you know about the image, using metadata, and a text file that has the same name as the photo but ends in ‘.txt.’ (TextWrangler is a good text app for Macs.)
  7. Look for clues in the photos. For example, the above photo was labeled as, “Lizzie Speery.” Looking at other photos, there was another, older Lizzie in the group:
    Lizzie
    Lizzie

    It is hard to read the writing, but this photo definitely says, “Lizzie”- maybe ‘Hines’? Then it looks like the name of a city, and possibly ‘NY” after.

    Think about the context- two Lizzies, the only person to have 2 photos in the collection. Different last names, but the first image was a young girl, the second a mature woman, and the different last name is likely a married name.

    Could these Lizzies be the same person with some years in between photos? Take a look at her eyes, chin, nose- what do you think? (Let us know in the comments.)

  8. Try to date the photos by dress, type of image, etc. Maureen Taylor, “The Photo Detective,” has excellent books, webinars, classes, speaks at genealogy conferences, and will even do video/phone consults; there are other resources as well to help determine approximate time periods. In the case of our two Lizzies, dating each photo might help us determine if they could possibly be the same person. Lizzie might have been a childhood friend or a distant cousin, possibly who moved away, but then the women exchanged photos in later years?
  9. If there is information available about a photo studio on the back of the image, use Google to try to learn when and where the photographer was in business to give you clues. They often changed the backs of photos as they added a partner or one moved on, or just to update their look or logo. Sometimes images on eBay can even help one determine the years a photo studio was in business, giving you another clue to time period.
  10. Crowd-source your detective hunt by posting your unknown photos on a blog, a website such as DeadFred, Facebook, etc.And, as always, keep copies of your photos and the description file on your own computer or media- online services may not be here forever, some use proprietary software that will not be readable in the future, etc. (Text (.txt) files  should be readable for a long time.) This is redundant but redundancy is a good backup. Keep copies of all these images somewhere other than your computer- a drive you keep in a safe deposit box, give to a sibling, etc. The cloud is a good option too, but not failsafe, so always have your own copies.


Notes, Sources, and References: 

  1. Fannie Belle Brown Chapman Collection, with permission.
  2. Lizzie Speery apparently worked as or with a photographer.

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images. Click to enlarge images.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.