Those Places Thursday: Robert Woodson Daniel’s Iowa Farm in 1879

1880 Agriculture Schedule excerpt for Robert Woodson Daniel(s), Jasper County, Iowa.
1880 Agriculture Schedule excerpt for Robert Woodson Daniel(s), Jasper County, Iowa, available on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org. (Click to enlarge.)

Daniel Family, Roberts Family (Click for Family Tree)

[Edited to add- Oops! This was supposed to post next week, after the Workday Wednesday posts- sorry.]

Robert Woodson “R.W.” Daniel was the husband of Margaret Ann Hemphill and the father of Ella V. Daniel, who married George A. Roberts 16 April 1885. Ella V. and George had two children who provided them descendants: Ethel Gay Roberts Robinson, and Edith Roberts McMurray Luck.  R.W. and Mary Ann also had another child who lived to have children: Lily G. Daniel, wife of George Washington Walker. If you are descended from any of these folks, R.W. and Mary Ann are two more ancestors who tilled the soil. (See the postWorkday Wednesday: Tilling the Soil, Part 2“)

The 1880 US Federal Census Non-Population Schedule for Robert Woodson “R.W.” Daniels tells us that he owned 80 acres of Jasper County, Iowa farmland in 1879-80. The land was worth $2000 total, plus they had $110 of farming implements and machinery, and livestock worth $670.

Using an inflation calculator to compare R.W.’s farmland value indicates it would have been worth about $47,600. in 2014 dollars, or $595 per acre. Today’s Iowa farmland goes for ten times that price per acre, and more. Land was not quite as valuable in 1879, however, since there was still so much of it available in the West.

R.W. paid $3 in 1879 for farm labor, which included value of board (food). His expenses also included $17 for building and farm repair in 1879.

The Daniel’s farm production for 1879 was valued at $1072, which included any commodities consumed, on hand, or sold. This amount was equivalent to about $25,500. in 2014 dollars, which does not seem like a lot of income for a family. They did, however, grow most of their own food, so their farm income would stretch a lot further than it seems.

Acreage included 6 acres mown, 10 not mown, and those grasslands produced 6 tons of hay. On the 35 acres planted in Indian corn in 1879, 1,700 bushels were produced (48.5 bu/ac; today we get 4-5 times that amount with our high intensity farming practices); 514 bu. of oats (for the working horses?) were produced on 16 acres; 8 acres sown with rye seed produced 150 bu., and 8 acres of wheat resulted in 96 bu. of that essential grain, probably much of it to be ground for home use for flour.

R. W. also planted 3 acres in potatoes, providing 400 bu. for the family and for sale, and they most probably had a vegetable garden as did most families in rural areas, although that would not have been listed in the schedule.

Interestingly, the number of acres listed above totals 86 acres, but only 80 were listed as his total.

R.W. and Margaret Ann had 7 horses on hand to do the farm labor and provide transportation. On 01 June 1880, they had 2 “Milch” cows (Margaret Ann probably milked them) and 4 ‘other’ head of cattle. In the year 1879, 2 calves were dropped (born) on the farm, 3 cattle were sold living, and 1 died, strayed, or was stolen.

The milch cows produced enough rich milk to make 250 lbs. of butter that was churned in 1879, probably by Margaret Ann and her daughters, Ella and Lily. R. W. and family also owned 17 swine and 100 chickens on 01 June 1880. In 1879, their chickens produced 300 eggs; caring for the chickens and gathering eggs was probably also a part of the chores of Margaret Ann and the girls.

R.W.’s daughter, Ella V. Daniel Roberts, and her daughter Edith Roberts McMurray Luck mentioned in Workday Wednesday: Tilling the Soil, Part 1, did a thriving business in eggs and butter in their days, too, on the Old Homeplace. They sold them in town, to a grocer named William Elmer McMurray… who just happened to be the father of Edith’s future husband.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

1) Robert Woodson “R.W.” Daniel (1843-1922), Margaret Ann Hemphill (1839-1915).

2) R.W. Daniel 1880 Agriculture schedule: Census Year: 1880; Census Place: Mound Prairie, Jasper, Iowa. Ancestry.com. Selected U.S. Federal Census Non-Population Schedules, 1850-1880 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. (OS Page:11, Line No. 09, Enumeration date 10 July 1880.)

3) Inflation calculator- http://www.davemanuel.com/inflation-calculator.php. Inflation calculators take a lot into consideration, and may vary widely in the values calculated because of those factors.

 

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Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
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Talented Tuesday: A Bit More Buster Brodie

Buster Brodie in a group of Little People, 07 October 1928 in Culver City, California at the Hunt Hotel.  Autographed "To Ruth & Harry From Buster Brodie." (Click to enlarge.)
Buster Brodie in a group of Little People, 07 October 1928 in Culver City, California at the Hunt Hotel. Autographed “To Ruth & Harry From Buster Brodie.” Buster is the second tallest, standing in back to left of center. Buster Brodie was the stage name of Max Broida. (Click to enlarge.)

Broida Family (Click for Family Tree)

[NOTE: Photo updated 13 May 2015 with higher resolution scan and enhancements.]

Previous posts (see notes below) about Buster Brodie revealed that his real name was Max Broida, and that he performed in the circus and vaudeville, as well as silent and ‘talkie’ movies.

We were thrilled to receive a comment on the second of those posts from DAC of Austin, Texas, stating that she had a picture of Buster Brodie that she would like to send to someone in the family. A quick email correspondence provided an address for mailing the image, and a bit of provenance: she and her daughter found it in a small antique store in Georgetown, Texas. Once we do a high resolution scan, the image will be donated to the Broida Family Collection at the Saul Brodsky Jewish Community Library in St. Louis, Missouri. We can’t thank DAC enough for rescuing this unique image and then contacting us through the blog to share.

Buster is easy to identify- he was bald by 1928, so it is Buster standing in the back, taller than most of the other people. He is just to the left of the hanging lantern on the far left. His bald  pate blends somewhat with the light background. If the picture is enlarged, one can tell that he was wearing a bow tie. He would have looked very dapper- and his family would be proud, as so many of them worked in the clothing business.

The sign on the Hunt Hotel in Culver City, California, reads as follows:

“Largest Number of LITTLE PEOPLE

EVER ASSEMBLED UNDER ONE ROOF

IN AMERICA

at HOTEL HUNT

CULVER CITY CALIF   OCTOBER 7th 1928″

 

Of course, research would be needed…

 

So I Googled ‘Hunt Hotel” and learned that it was still in existence. It is across from, and near to, movie studios, including MGM in its day, and was a wild place full of “movie stars, bookies, and bums.” The hotel was, and still is, used as a location for many film shoots, both interior and exterior- Laurel & Hardy fans may recognize it from some of their films. Stories abound, including that John Wayne won it in a poker game from Charlie Chaplin for $1- apparently untrue. The hotel had fallen into disrepair as the community did, but when the movie studios came back to Culver City, the hotel was purchased and refurbished to its former glory.

At first, the thought was that maybe the get-together in the picture had to do with, “The Wizard of Oz” since the hotel housed many of the Little People who played Munchkins in that movie. But… that movie was released in 1939, and the date on this image was 1928.

More research…

 

The online article, “The Culver Hotel: Harry C. Culver’s Flatiron of Fun” By Hadley Meares, March 28, 2014 at www.kcet.org provided the reason for this get-together. MGM was filming a version of Jules Verne’s 1874 novel, “L’Île mystérieuse” (“The Mysterious Island”), which was a sort of prequel to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.” The movie included undersea human-like creatures with a duckbill helmet (head?); the Little People who played these parts were housed at the Hunt Hotel, as had been many Hollywood stars. The article states there were 40 Little People at the hotel in 1928 who posed for this picture- I only count 34.) The hotel topped both numbers in 1938, when 124 Little People were brought from all over the country to stay at the Culver City Hotel- it’s new name- while appearing in “The Wizard of Oz” as Munchkins and flying monkeys.

 

How did Buster Brodie/Max Broida end up in this group picture? He was short, to be sure, but was not a dwarf as far as we know. Was he a part of the extras in this movie? He is uncredited, if so, and no evidence has yet been found that he was in this movie- except possibly this picture. It is also conceivable that Buster answered a casting call for ‘little people’ for the MGM film- he had been in other MGM productions so this is plausible even though he was likely not technically a Little Person. Another possibility is that some of these Little People were members of “Singer’s Midgets,” a vaudeville group that Buster may have worked with during his time in vaudeville; they appeared in movies in the 1930s, including, “The Wizard of Oz.” Buster had also worked in the circus as a young man, and may have known some of these persons from those years.

The answer to how and why Buster was included in this picture may never be known, but we are so grateful for a genealogical act of kindness by DAC that brought up these questions, and for sharing this special picture with us so we can share with the world.

 

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

1) Talented Tuesday: Max Broida-Now Starring as Buster Brodie- http://heritageramblings.net/2015/04/07/talented-tuesday-max-broida-now-starring-as-buster-brodie/

The Real Max Broida, AKA Buster Brodie- http://heritageramblings.net/2015/04/10/the-real-max-broida-aka-buster-brodie/

2) Broida Family Collection at the Saul Brodsky Jewish Community Library- http://www.brodskylibrary.org/archives.php

3) Leo Singer/”Singer’s Midgets” article on Wikipedia- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_Singer

4) The Hunt/Culver Hotel-

http://www.culverhotel.com/default.aspx?pg=history

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culver_Hotel

http://www.hotelsoftherichandfamous.com/travel/North-America/United-States/California/Culver-City/Hotels/Culver-Hotel

“The Culver Hotel: Harry C. Culver’s Flatiron of Fun” By Hadley Meares, March 28, 2014, is an excellent article, an interesting read, and provided the solution to our mystery-

http://www.kcet.org/socal/departures/columns/lost-landmarks/the-culver-hotel-harry-c-culvers-flatiron-of-fun.html

http://www.culvercitynews.org/latest-news/ghosts-and-hollywood-glamour-inhabit-a-landmark/

5) “The Mysterious Island,” 1929, MGM resources-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mysterious_Island_(1929_film)

http://www.silentera.com/PSFL/data/M/MysteriousIsland1929.html

http://www.allmovie.com/movie/v103465

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0020198/

A fun image of the lobby card from the movie, which may be under copyright so cannot be posted, but worth the click-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Lobby_Card_for_the_1929_version_of_The_Mysterious_Island.jpg#/media/File:Lobby_Card_for_the_1929_version_of_The_Mysterious_Island.jpg

 

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Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
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Amanuensis Monday: Samuel T. Beerbower Obituary Transcription

Obituary of Samuel Taylor BEERBOWER, Marion Daily Star [Marion, OH], 12 July 1902, Vol. XXV, No. 194, Page 6. Posted with kind permission.
Obituary of Samuel Taylor BEERBOWER, Marion Daily Star [Marion, OH], 12 July 1902, Vol. XXV, No. 194, Page 6. Posted with kind permission. (Click to enlarge and make more readable.)
Beerbower Family (Click for Family Tree)

An ‘amanuensis’ is a person who  has been employed to take dictation or copy manuscripts. As family historians, that is a huge part of our work. It is especially important for items handwritten in script, as today’s generation is hardly learning cursive in school; with the advent of computers, so little is written with a pen or pencil, and future generations may look at cursive writing like it is a foreign language. Handwriting is very hard to OCR (though they are working on it), so it is very important to get manuscripts transcribed; transcription will also help with Google searches to make more knowledge available to all.

While Samuel T. Beerbower’s obituary is not in cursive, the digitized newspaper is very hard to read. We have looked at a couple of sources for the image and they are all challenging to read. We are still hoping to find a better copy, but for now this will have to do, and posting the transcription on the blog will allow Google and other searches to pick it up for other Beerbower descendants.

Another thing transcribing helps one to do is to check facts, dates, places, etc. Dates especially can be hard to read- for instance, the marriage year above seems to be 1847, but by cross-checking what is already known with blowing up the image as much as possible, we know the date should be 1867. Of course, obituaries, like death certificates, often have errors, as they depend on accurate recall during a time of great stress by an informant who probably was not present for most of the events.

Samuel T. Beerbower’s death was 10 July 1902.

 

A PROMINENT
CITIZEN DEAD

Samuel T. Beerbower Dies Early This
Morning
—————————
AFTER AN ILLNESS OF
ABOUT EIGHT MONTHS
—————————
Suffers an Injury to His Right Leg by
Jumping Out of a Wagon Compli-
cations Arise and He Never Recov-
ers- Leaves a Widow, One Son and
Many Friends

Mr. Samuel T. Beerbower of east
Center street died this morning at 7
o’clock after an illness extending over
a period of eight months.

Mr Beerbower jumped off a wagon
last October and severely injured his
right leg. He was confined to his bed
and, owing to his advanced age, a com-
plication of diseases set in. He would
rally at times, but just as often he suf-
fered relapses and gradually grew
weaker. His life has been despaired of
for some time and the news of his
death this morning did not come as a
shock to his many friends.

Mr. Beerbower was born in Frank-
lin county, November 10, 1842. He was
the oldest of nine children and moved
to Marion with his parents when he
was but a little over a year old. His
youth was spent in this city, and at
the breaking out of the war, at the age
of nineteen, he enlisted in company A,
Sixty-Fourth Ohio Volunteer infantry.
He served in the Army of the Cumb-
erland and was in the battles of Per-
ryville, Stone River, Chattanooga,
Chickamauga and Mission Ridge. In
the latter battle he was struck by a
ball in the right shoulder. This wound
confined him in hospitals in Chatta-
nooga and Nashville for over three
months, the wound causing paralysis
of the right arm and hand. He receiv-
ed an honorable discharge March 22,
1864.

In 1865, having recovered from his
wound, Mr. Beerbower accepted a po-
sition with the firm of Lucas & Sef-
ner. Later he was employed by Reed
& Yake, and in 1868 he was appointed
postmaster by President Grant. he
served thirteen years in that capacity.
He was united in marriage with Miss
Irene Peters, January 13, 1867, and two
children were born to the union, one of
whom, Cornell, survives.

Mr. Beerbower leaves, beside his wife
and son, a large number of friends to
mourn his death. He was an honored
and highly respected citizen and was
a member of the Elks, Odd Fellows,
Knights of Pythias and the G. A. R.
He had gone through the chairs of
most, if not all, of the various lodges
of which he was a member.

The funeral service will be held at
the late residence of the deceased Mon-
day afternoon at 4-o’clock. The re=
mains will be placed in the vault.

The remains may be viewed from 2
to 4 o’clock Sunday and 10 to 12 o’clock
Monday.

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

1) Obituary citation as above. Via Ancestry.com-

http://interactive.ancestry.com/6431/news-oh-marion-mariondlystar.1898_06_11_0008/471018504?backurl=&ssrc=pt_t4049043_p-1645243095_kpidz0q3d-1645243095z0q26pgz0q3d32768z0q26pgplz0q3dpid_m1&backlabel=ReturnToTree&rc=1742,479,1894,521;2275,3192,2431,3221;2535,3192,2795,3221

2) Transcribed by the author.

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
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Sunday’s Obituary: Samuel T. Beerbower

Obituary of Samuel Taylor BEERBOWER, Marion Daily Star [Marion, OH], 12 July 1902, Vol. XXV, No. 194, Page 6. Posted with kind permission.
Obituary of Samuel Taylor BEERBOWER, Marion Daily Star [Marion, OH], 12 July 1902, Vol. XXV, No. 194, Page 6. Posted with kind permission. (Click to enlarge and sharpen text.)
Beerbower Family (Click for Family Tree)

[We apologize for the quality of this image, but since the last 2 updates of WordPress, images are blurred like this when enlarged for the blog. If you click on it, however, it will be very readable. Sorry, no time to figure this out-  have already spent a lot of time trying to no avail, and would prefer researching and writing to fussing with a stupid computer program.]

[Edited 27 Apr 2015 to add: see 27 Apr 2015 post for transcription.]

Notes, Sources, and References: 

1) Citation as above. Via Ancestry.com-

http://interactive.ancestry.com/6431/news-oh-marion-mariondlystar.1898_06_11_0008/471018504?backurl=&ssrc=pt_t4049043_p-1645243095_kpidz0q3d-1645243095z0q26pgz0q3d32768z0q26pgplz0q3dpid_m1&backlabel=ReturnToTree&rc=1742,479,1894,521;2275,3192,2431,3221;2535,3192,2795,3221

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
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Those Places Thursday: Lambert Field in St. Louis, MO.

Gerard William Helbling at Lambert Airfield in St. Louis, Missouri. (Click to enlarge.)
Gerard William “G.W.” Helbling at Lambert Airfield in St. Louis, Missouri, 1931. (Click to enlarge.)

 

Helbling Family (Click for Family Tree)

Browsing my files for other photographs for other posts, I came upon this one that I had not really noticed before (more Heritage Ramblings). Anna May Beerbower Helbling was good at keeping photos in albums (lucky us!), and she labeled them well most of the time (even luckier us!). This photo was in an album from 1931.

Growing up in the northern St. Louis suburbs, Lambert Airfield was an integral part of life. The whole family would load up in the two-tone blue AMC Rambler station wagon, circa 1960?- and head out for the parking area across from the main runway at Lambert. We took popcorn and snacks, and watched the planes come in and fly out, and just talked as a family. As we got older, we didn’t want  to go with family, but instead went with boyfriends…

The history of the airport is interesting. It began as a launching base for hot air balloons in Kinloch Park. The Wright Brothers visited the field, bringing their aircraft and pilots on tour sometime between 1910-1911. President Theodore Roosevelt was the first president to fly, and he did so from Lambert in 1910. The first experimental parachute jump took place at the Kinloch base. The field was purchased by the Aero Club of St. Louis along with the old Kinloch Racing Track plus 170 cornfield acres, and became the Lambert-St. Louis Flying Field. A passenger terminal and hangars were built after the property was purchased in february 1925 by Albert B. Lambert, for whom the field was named. Lambert was the first St. Louisan to receive a pilot’s license, and a major supporter of Charles Lindbergh.

Charles Lindbergh played a role in early Lambert Airfield history before his famous flight across the Atlantic- his first job flying was ferrying air mail from Lambert Field. In 1927, Lindbergh had been at Lambert one week before he went to New York to begin his historic flight to Paris. “The Spirit of St. Louis” replica plane that hung in the concourse was always a favorite stop when we would go for a day’s visit to the airport, or to meet family- back then, you could be waiting at the gate for loved ones and watch them walk down the rolling open stairway and cross the tarmac from plane to terminal. That same year as Lindbergh’s historic flight (1927), the airport was sold to the City of St. Louis, and it became the first airport owned by a city in the US. The airport complex included a Naval Air Station (there are lots of pilots in the Navy) which became an active duty base during World War II and a base for manufacturing by McDonnell Aircraft and Curtiss-Wright.

This is how airplanes of that era looked:

1929 Fairchild KR-34C
1929 Fairchild KR-34C at an airshow in 2009. From Wikimedia, CC License.

G.W. Helbling was a prodigious reader, thinker, tinkerer (he developed a vibrating bed for his wife who suffered from bedsores likely due to diabetes and being bedridden), and man of many interests even though he never received formal education beyond the eighth grade. It is highly probable that he was very interested in flight.  He got married the year after the Wright Brothers completed their first powered flight in 1903, so was old enough to follow the developments of the industry. Knowing him, it is highly likely that he attended the Wright Brothers’ flying exhibition.

It is wonderful to have at least the caption in the photo album for this picture, but we do so wish there was more information. Had G.W. gone to Lambert sightseeing like his descendants did, or was he out there to pick up a fearless airplane passenger? Was he out there just to watch “those daring young men in their flying machines”? Or maybe even take a flight himself? We probably will never know, but what a treasure we have found in this image!

The old cars give us a comparison to see the size of the airplane hangars of the day. G. W. died in 1971, so he did see a lot of expansion and changes at Lambert-St. Louis Airport, including the addition of the iconic terminal built in 1953-6.

Lambert-St. Louis Airport, circa 1960s?
Lambert-St. Louis Airport, circa 1960s? With kind permission via CardCow.com.

Below is Lambert airfield in 2010- with its 9,000 ft. runway and redesigned terminals, G.W. wouldn’t recognize it!

Lambert field from the air
“Lambert field from the air” by United States Geological Survey – High Resolution Orthoimagery via EROS. 2014. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lambert_field_from_the_air.jpg#/media/File:Lambert_field_from_the_air.jpg

 

Notes, Sources, and References: 

1) Additional Lambert-St. Louis images: https://www.google.com/maps/uv?hl=en&pb=!1s0x87df36b4c56388f1:0x9dabcdbc663077a6!2m5!2m2!1i80!2i80!3m1!2i100!3m1!7e1!4shttp://www.panoramio.com/photo/91063151!5slambert+st+louis+airport+terminal+1959+-+Google+Search&sa=X&ei=PnQ2VcrmMvG0sAT814CIAw&ved=0CIcBEKIqMA4

2) Wikipedia articles:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lambert–St._Louis_International_Airport

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wright_brothers

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wright_Exhibition_Team

3) CardCow.com– a great resource to buy old postcards, and they generously allow posting of their images with attribution and a link.

 

 

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We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post (see form below), and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.
 

Original content copyright 2013-2015 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Family history is meant to be shared, but the original content of this site may NOT be used for any commercial purposes unless explicit written permission is received from both the blog owner and author. Blogs or websites with ads and/or any income-generating components are included under “commercial purposes,” as are the large genealogy database websites. Sites that republish original HeritageRamblings.net content as their own are in violation of copyright as well, and use of full content is not permitted.
 
Descendants and researchers MAY download images and posts to share with their families, and use the information on their family trees or in family history books with a small number of reprints. Please make sure to credit and cite the information properly.
 
Please contact us if you have any questions about copyright of our blog material.