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Sentimental Sunday: 1937 Broida Family Reunion

This entry is part 2 of 4 in the series Broida Family Reunions
1938 Broida Reunion News, page 1
1938 Broida Reunion News, page 1. (Click to enlarge.)

Family members who attended the early reunions always spoke sentimentally about the fun and love always present at Broida Reunions. Here is what was snail-mailed to family members after the big 1937 event. The newsletter must have been typeset, as the typewriters of the day could not do such formatting and font changes- something that we can now do at home in no time.

1938 Broida Reunion News, page 2. (Click to enlarge.)
1938 Broida Reunion News, page 2. (Click to enlarge.)

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Family treasure chest.

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images.

Copyright 2013-2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

 
We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post, and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.

Friday’s Faces from the Past: 1937 Broida Reunion, Youngstown, Ohio

This entry is part 1 of 4 in the series Broida Family Reunions
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. 2A
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. 2A

The Broida family held reunions in both Youngstown, Ohio, and Pittsburgh Pennsylvania (about 65 miles away), two of the main cities of Broida family settlement. There were meetings and committees and newsletters and much planning to make the reunions a success, which they always accomplished. Reunions were held in the 1930s-1950s, and then there was a lull until two in the 1990s.

Broida Family Reunion in Pittsburgh Criterion, July 9, 1937, page 14.
Broida Family Reunion in Pittsburgh Criterion, July 9, 1937, page 14.

The picture of those who attended is a long picture that must be rolled up for storage, hence some of the cracks in the images. Numerous family members still have this photo, and a copy may also be found in the Broida Family Collection, Saul Brodsky Jewish Library in St. Louis, Missouri.

A Broida Reunion News of 1937, written after the reunion, states there are many missing faces from the photo- over 300 attended the event. We do know that many of the descendants of John Broida attended, and there are a number of other Broida lines represented.

We are posting here sections of the photo, in hopes that crowd-sourcing will help us identify the people in the picture. We do know four persons and have included an annotated image with names.

Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #1
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #1
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #2B
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #2B
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #3
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #3
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #4
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #4
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #5A
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #5A
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #5B
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #5B
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #6A
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #6A
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #7
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #7
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #8A
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #8A
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #8A
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #8B
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #9A
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #9A
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #9B
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #9B
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #9C
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #9C
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #9C-annotated
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #9C-annotated
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #9D
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #9D
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #10
Fourth Annual Broida Family Reunion, July 11, 1937. Youngstown, Ohio. #10

Please contact us if you have information that would help identify some of the persons in these images. (We will not post information about those still living, but would like to know the information for our files.)

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Family photo and ephemera collections.

2) Saul Brodsky Jewish Community Library, St. Louis, Missouri. http://brodskylibrary.org/archives.php. A small family reunion was held here with cousins from St. Louis and Colorado, to explore the collection.

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images.

Copyright 2013-2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and lmm, jrw.

 
We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post, and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.

Tombstone Tuesday: Henrich Weidner and Catharina Mull Weidner in Weidner Robinson Cemetery

 

Weidner Robinson Cemetery, Newton, Catawba County, North Carolina
Weidner Robinson Cemetery, Newton, Catawba County, North Carolina. (Click to enlarge.)

A recent visit to the Weidner Robinson Cemetery was an opportunity to see the burial spot of Henrich and Catharina Weidner, as well as their replaced tombstones. To keep the ravages of time, weather, and vandals at bay, the original tombstones were moved to the Newton Historical Museum, Catawba County, North Carolina. (See last week’s Tombstone Tuesday: Heinrich and Catharina Weidner.)

 

Their replacement stones have the original German inscriptions, although in a more readable way than just getting every letter possible on each line with words broken between lines.

Henrich Widner- Replaced Tombstone in German. Weidner Robinson Cemetery, Newton, Catawba County, North Carolina.
Henrich Weidner- Replaced Tombstone in German. Weidner Robinson Cemetery, Newton, Catawba County, North Carolina. (Click to enlarge.) 

English versions of the inscriptions were added to the other side of the replacement tombstone.

Henrichl Widner- Replaced Tombstone in English. Weidner Robinson Cemetery, Newton, Catawba County, North Carolina.
Henrich Weidner- Replaced Tombstone in English. Weidner Robinson Cemetery, Newton, Catawba County, North Carolina. (Click to enlarge.)

Catharina’s replacement tombstone is also in German on one side.

Catharina Mull Widener- Replaced Tombstone in German. Weidner Robinson Cemetery, Newton, Catawba County, North Carolina.
Catharina Mull Widener- Replaced Tombstone in German. Weidner Robinson Cemetery, Newton, Catawba County, North Carolina. (Click to enlarge.)

The other side also features an English inscription.

Catharina Mull Widener- Replaced Tombstone in English. Weidner Robinson Cemetery, Newton, Catawba County, North Carolina.
Catharina Mull Widner- Replaced Tombstone in English. Weidner Robinson Cemetery, Newton, Catawba County, North Carolina. (Click to enlarge.)

Weidner Robinson Cemetery also includes a stone with information concerning the family history of the Henrich Weidner-Catharina Mull family.

Weidner Monument with Family History. Weidner Robinson Cemetery, Newton, Catawba County, North Carolina.
Weidner Monument with Family History. Weidner Robinson Cemetery, Newton, Catawba County, North Carolina. (Click to enlarge.)

Thankfully it is all in English.

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Heritage Ramblings post on the original Weidner stones- http://heritageramblings.net/2014/08/05/tombstone-tuesday-heinrich-and-catharina-weidner/

2) All photos taken by James R. Whitener, July, 2014.

3) Weidner Robinson Cemetery on Find A Grave- http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=2227187&CScn=weidner+robinson&CScntry=4&CSst=29&CScnty=1668&

 

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images.

Copyright 2013-2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

 
We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post, and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.

Mappy Monday: Catawba County NC and the Weidner Homestead

Map of North Carolina highlighting Catawba County. Wikimedia, public domain.
Map of North Carolina highlighting Catawba County. Wikimedia, public domain.

Catawba County, North Carolina, previously a northern part of Lincoln County, was formed in 1842. Those with ancestors in Catawba Co. might also want to search records for adjacent counties, as the area had also been a part of  Bladen County until 1750, Anson County 1750-1753, Rowan County 1753-1777, and Burke County, 1777-1782. Catawba County is located in North Carolina’s Piedmont, in the western portion of the state.

Catawba County sits amidst ridges and rolling hills in the northern section, and  flatter areas in the south, with the Appalachian Mountains off to the west, and the coastal plain as one heads east. It is rich with waterways, important for early colonists for many reasons, including transportation.

Homestead of Heinrich Widener descendants, near Heinrich's original homestead, Catawba County, North Carolina.
Homestead of Heinrich Widener descendants, near Heinrich’s original homestead, Catawba County, North Carolina.

Named after the Catawba Indians who roamed the area in the early years, German settlers migrated there in the late 1740s, as did English and Scots-Irish families. The Northern Irish Presbyterians, ‘Orangemen,’ Scot-Irish, English, and Scottish immigrants settled mostly in the southeast portion of what is now Catawba County.

Homestead of Heinrich Widener descendants, near Heinrich's original homestead, Catawba County, North Carolina.
Homestead of Heinrich Widener descendants, near Heinrich’s original homestead, Catawba County, North Carolina.

The higher section of the county was similar to the Rhine Valley of French Germany, and many of the German families migrated to this area. They would have not been as homesick, perhaps, living here, and would have known the crops and animals that would thrive in such an area. The Germans included Rhenish Palatines, Swiss, Saxon, and other groups. Their religions included Lutheran, Mennonite, Moravian, Dunkard, Reformed, Anabaptist, and other Protestant sects.

Many of these settlers later moved to Southeast Missouri, which is what happened in our line of Whiteners.

Catawba County was the home of Heinrich Widner and his wife, Catharina Moll. The couple were German immigrants who married in Pennsylvania, but, like many, migrated to the Carolinas by 1750, probably using the Great Wagon Road. They would have submitted their land claim to the Crown through the Governor.

Henry Whitner Land Grants. Excerpted from NCGenWeb.
Henry Whitner Land Grants. Excerpted from NCGenWeb. Note the Mull families nearby- possibly a relationship with Catharina (Moll) Widner?

The land is still owned by Widner descendants- one generation after another has inherited the Widner land, which has never been sold after receiving the original land grant.

2014_0717-18_WIDENER homestead-lake Henrich and his wife settled near a spring to have fresh water. That same spring feeds the above lake on property owned by his descendants.

The French & Indian Wars were occurring regularly during this early settlement, and the families would have been very isolated due to frequent raids and depredations along the frontier. The American Revolution influenced those in this area as well- battles at King’s Mountain, Cowpens, and Ramsours Mill would have taken their sons, their livestock and crops, and caused much hardship among the settlers.

It most probably was not as romantic a time as seen in the movies. But the colonists persevered, and descendants now can walk their paths in Catawba County, North Carolina.

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

  1. Please Note: As stated above, the Weidner homestead and cemetery are on privately owned land. The original Weidner headstones have been moved to protect them and may be seen at the museum of the Historical Association of Catawba County; see http://catawbahistory.org/museum-of-history for more information. Also, the Weidner-Robinson Cemetery has been recorded on Find A Grave and 86% of the stones have been photographed- http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=2227187&CScnty=1668&CSsr=201&
  2.  Photos by James Whitener, taken on his family trip to Catawba County, NC, July, 2014.
  3. Wikipedia entry for Catawba County, North Carolina: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catawba_County,_North_Carolina
  4. Catawba Co. NC at the NCGenWeb Project- http://www.ncgenweb.us/catawba
  5. Catawba County Land Grants on US GenWeb- http://www.ncgenweb.us/catawba/media/SouthWest.jpg
  6. Interesting information on the Great Wagon Road- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Wagon_Road
  7. Links to our recent blog posts on Heinrich and Catharina Weidner:

“Tombstone Tuesday: Heinrich and Catharina Weidner”- http://heritageramblings.net/2014/08/05/tombstone-tuesday-heinrich-and-catharina-weidner/

“Wishful Wednesday: Heinrich Weidner and Catharina Moll in Catawba County, NC”- http://heritageramblings.net/2014/07/30/wishful-wednesday-heinrich-weidner-and-catharina-moll-in-catawba-county-nc/

Don’t forget our search box if you want to learn more about this family!

 

Please contact us if you would like a higher resolution image.

Copyright 2013-2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

 
We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post, and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.

Tombstone Tuesday: Heinrich and Catharina Weidner

 

Henrich Widener and Catharina (Moll) Weidener- Tombstones
Henrich Widener and Catharina (Moll) Weidener- Tombstones

These original tombstones for Henrich Weidner and his wife Catharina Moll are in the Newton Historical Museum, Catawba County, North Carolina. They are carved out of soapstone native to the area, and were, of course, hand carved after the deaths of Henrich and Catharina, in 1792 and 1804, respectively. Soapstone is easy to carve, but also deteriorates easily. The Catawba County Weidner family donated the original headstones to the county historical society, to protect them from the elements as well as from vandalism. They have been replaced with copies where the Wideners were originally buried near Jacob’s Fork River.

The person who carved the stones used every inch of the stone, sometimes breaking a word with a few letters placed on the next line. The stones were carved  in German, the language Henrich and his family probably spoke much of the time, especially in their early years in the colonies.

Closeup of Henrich Weidner's Headstone. (click to enlarge)
Closeup of Henrich Weidner’s Headstone (click to enlarge)

Translation of headstones:

Henrich We-

idner was

born in

year 1717 on

19 Octob-

er and is d-

ead in y-

ear 1792 on

31 July an-

d is age wa-

s 75 year-

s and 7 mo-

nths

 

ATMC= (Unknown)

Catharina We-

idner was b-

orn in ye-ar 1733 on 24 M-

ay and is de-

ad on 26 A-

ugust 1804 and

is age was 7[1]

years 7 months

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Images taken by James Whitener, July 2014, in the Newton Historical Museum, Catawba County, North Carolina.

Please contact us if you would like a higher resolution image.

Copyright 2013-2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog, James Whitener, and pmm.

 
We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post, and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.