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Sorting Saturday: Harley Rupert Wiley

Harley Rupert Wiley, or Harlen R. Wiley, in the 1914 "The Graduate" yearbook of the University of California Medical Center, page 12. HathiTrust, public domain.
Harley Rupert Wiley, or Harlen R. Wiley, in the 1914 “The Graduate” yearbook of the University of California Medical Center, page 12. HathiTrust, public domain.

Sorting your research is a daunting project but necessary to tell the stories. I have been deep into sorting and compiling- all to culminate in an exciting event, which is why the blog has been so quiet lately. But I digress… and will share soon.

A good review and sort will help one to see patterns, aid in putting two and two together now that you know more, and help you to find where there is conflicting information. One tip that I find really helpful is to title my files in a standard way. (See my previous posts Tuesday’s Tip- Let your computer create a timeline! and Tuesday’s Tip-Organizing Computer Files.)

Looking through my files lately has helped me realized that some dates were inconsistent, or just couldn’t be correct- very easy to see when they are side by side. It also made me realize as I sorted through that some things that needed to be together weren’t, and others that should have been were not, so I corrected that. More lightbulbs went on as I saw these new files ‘automagically’ sorted together.

While working on my exciting project and trying to identify people in a wedding party picture, I realized that I had never seen a picture of Harley R. Wiley, though I had a hunch he might be in the photo. Harley was a professor of pharmaceutical (sometimes called ‘pharmacal’ in those days) jurisprudence at the University of California. He lectured at both the Berkeley and San Francisco campuses, and had an office in San Francisco while residing in Berkeley.

Harley R. Wiley listed as Faculty in "The Graduate" yearbook of the University of California Medical Center, page 93. Hathi Trust, public domain.
Harley R. Wiley listed as Faculty in “The Graduate” yearbook of the University of California Medical Center, page 93. Hathi Trust, public domain.

He wrote a book called, “A Treatise on Pharmacal Jurisprudence with a thesis on the law in general,” The Hicks-Judd Company, San Francisco, 1904. The book was self-published, as he was a pioneer in the field and there were, at that time, no textbooks on pharmacy and the law.

Harley also wrote numerous poems, many published in the literary magazines of the day, or as fillers in other publications. He wrote with the idea of nature as spirit. Some of his poems include, “The Soul of a City,” “Star of Bethlehem,” “The Desert,” and “Dust and Flame.” Harley’s California Biographical Index card lists Appleton’s Booklovers Magazine, The Overland Monthly and Out West magazine, and The Raven-Western Field as periodicals for which he had written.

Harley spoke to many groups, with the historian James Redpath commenting, after an address by Wiley, that he had “eloquence and good sense in rare combination.”

In early California, land speculation was popular. At one time, Harley owned 2,000 acres.

Although one would think that being a published poet, lecturer, professor, land speculator, and lawyer would be enough, Harley had another claim to fame- he was the brother of Ninetta (Wiley) Eames Payne (Springer), who raised Charmian Kittredge; Charmian would later marry Jack London, the author. Ninetta worked with Jack London closely, managing many of his business affairs. Ninetta, like Harley, traveled in California literary circles as she too was a writer and host of many summer camps for (adult) intellectuals. Edward B. Payne, a writer, minister, lecturer, and philosopher, was Ninetta’s second husband, and he was very close to his in-laws Harley and Villa. Harley participated in many of these same gatherings, whether they were just family or for the intellectuals of the Bay Area or Sonoma County; many of the events included Jack London.

Learning more about Harley corroborated a story that Ninetta told of the family’s 1865 migration to Utah and then California, in which their wagon train was attacked. The party was split and the other  group was massacred by the Indians, with the Wiley family barely escaping. Ninetta was sometimes ‘flowery’ in her descriptions, so some researchers had wondered how much of the story was true. Reading about it in Harley’s biography- collateral kin research- makes us realize that the horrors of the story were real, not imagined nor exaggerated.

A bit of the Harlen Rupert Wiley vitals-

– He was born 5 Apr 1855 in on a farm 14 miles outside Oshkosh, Wisconsin to Jacob Scott Wiley and Catherine Growall, the youngest of seven children.

– Harley lived in Santa Barbara, Monticello, Redding, Berkeley, Oakland, and San Francisco, California. There are censuses and city directories that seem to have conflicting information for a certain date, but that is because he had offices in other cites at times.

– Graduating from Christian College at Santa Rosa, California, in 1877 with an A.B. degree after just three years of study, he had also taught bookkeeping, arithmetic, and algebra while himself a student.

– Harley also graduated from the University of California, Class of 1897, L.L.B. Hastings College of the Law, San Francisco.

– Becoming a Christian  while at Christian College, Harley was ordained a minister around 1877 when he graduated.

– Harley married first Sarah Prudy ___ by 1878- maiden name unknown. They had two children together: Lucille, one year old in the 2 Jun 1880 census (although 1900 census states she was born Sep 1878), and a son born in Dec 1879, who was 6/12 yrs per same census, but had not yet been named. In 1900 Sarah is listed as Prudy Wiley in the census, listed as a widow and living with her daughter. Her son was still alive, and their daughter Lucille was a bookkeeper, a skill that Harley probably taught her. Harley had remarried by 1900 so apparently the couple had actually divorced.

– His second marriage was to Villa Chappell 26 Dec 1885 in Redding, California. They had two children- Villa Elizabeth Wiley, born Nov 1888, and Esmond F. Wiley (or Don Esmond Wiley), born 1890.

– An excellent description of Harley’s early life may be found in the  “Memorial and Biographical History of Northern California,” pages 535-6, 1891- see below for links.

– Harley died 17 Sep 1921 in Alta Bates Sanitorium in Berkeley after a protracted illness, at the age of 65. We have been unable to find where he was buried. (Many of those in this social group were cremated, so that may be the case with Harley as well.)

Harley R. Wiley obituary, Oakland Tribune, 17 Sep 1921.
Harley R. Wiley obituary, Oakland Tribune, 17 Sep 1921.

The ‘Wiley House’ and cottages that were owned by Harley and Villa Wiley at 2545 Benvenue Avenue until 1921 are listed as Historic Landmark #199 in Berkeley, California.

 

PS- I really can’t tell if it is Harley Wiley in the wedding photo that started all this. But it was great to learn more about him and have an opportunity to tell his story.

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) “A Treatise on Pharmacal Jurisprudence with a thesis on the law in general”  may be read online at   https://archive.org/details/treatiseonpharma00wile. Accessed 05/31/2014.

2) Harley R. Wiley biography in “Memorial and Biographical History of Northern California,” page 535-6,  Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago, 1891. See http://books.google.com/books/about/A_Memorial_and_Biographical_History_of_N.html?id=m8FQAQAAIAAJ. Accessed 05/31/2014.

3) 7) California Biographical Index Card for Harley R. Wiley, 1906, through California State Library, now on Ancestry.com. Accessed 5/31/14.

4) “The Graduate” yearbook of the University of California Medical Center, 1914: http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.31378008244504;view=1up;seq=1. Accessed 05/30/2014.

5) Berkeley Landmarks by Susan Dinkelspiel Cerny, Berkeley [California] Architectural Heritage Association, 2001. Accessed on 5/31/14: http://www.ci.berkeley.ca.us/citycouncil/2002citycouncil/packet/121002/2002-12-10%20Item%2025%20Staff%20Report%20Backup%2010.pdf

 

 

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Friday’s Faces from the Past: Ruth N. Alexander and Wilhemina Schoor

 

Ruth Nadine (Alexander) Lee and her mother, Wilhemina (Schoor) Alexander at Lake Tanycomo, Missouri
Ruth Nadine Alexander and her mother, Wilhemina (Schoor) Alexander at Lake Taneycomo, Missouri, about 1928.

Since many folks will be heading off to lakes and beaches or just a picnic pavilion in a park this first big weekend of summer, here is a picture of two of our Lee ancestors relaxing at the lake. The place was Lake Taneycomo in southern Missouri, and the time was probably about 1928.

Ruth Nadine Alexander, on the left, was born 01 Feb 1906 in Missouri to George Harrington Alexander (1879-1951) and Wilhemina Schoor (1882-1942), on the right. Ruth was the second of six children, and lived in Missouri all her life.

On 27 Jul 1929, Ruth married Lloyd Eugene “Gene” Lee in Marshfield, Missouri. Their only child, Robert Eugene Lee, was born in 1932.

Sadly, Ruth died at the young age of 46 on 1 Dec 1953 in St. Louis, Missouri.
Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Family oral history, records, photos, and ephemera.

2) Find A Grave Memorial# 57013395 for Ruth Nadine Alexander: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=LEE&GSpartial=1&GSbyrel=all&GSst=26&GScntry=4&GSsr=4601&GRid=57013395&

 

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Wordless Wednesday: Postcard from Lena (Brandenburger) Gosch to her sister Lily F. (Brandenburger) Schillig

Postcard from Lena (Brandenburger) Gosch to her sister, Lily (Brandenburger) (Glass) Schillig.
Postcard from Lena (Brandenburger) Gosch to her sister, Lily (Brandenburger) (Glass) Schillig. [Click to enlarge.]

Wow, lots of words in the title for a Wordless Wednesday post.

 

And now I can’t be wordless, because as I was fact-checking the married names of the sisters for the caption, I learned a bit more about sweet “Eloies” who had apparently been ill.

The card was postmarked 23 Aug 1912.

Christina Eloise Glass died 17 Sep 1912.

Dear Eloise was just 12 years old, as she was born 08 Dec 1899 in Texas.

Eloise’s father, James Maynard “Jimmie” Glass had been a physician, but passed away 28 Feb 1903 at the young age of 36. Eloise’s mother, Lily F. Brandenburger, remarried and she and Eloise were living with Lily’s second husband Fredrick C. Schillig and children from his previous marriage.

The death certificate of Eloise states that she died of a malignant intracranial tumor that affected her cerebellum.

She was buried in Bunker Hill, Illinois, on 19 Sep 1912.

 

I really hate it when a “Wordless Wednesday” post becomes a “Wednesday’s Child” post.

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Postcard part of family ephemera collection.

2) Missouri death certificate online for Christina E. Glass, Certificate Number 31229: http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/resources/deathcertificates/Results.asp?type=basic&tLName=Glass&tFName=&sCounty=all&tYear=1912#null

3) One Ancestry tree has her name as “Christine” but I had not seen that name before in family information. It was a clue to watch for, though, as German folks often called their children by their middle name, in this case, Eloise. The death certificate documented her legal name as Christine E. Glass, and I knew it was our little Eloise because her step-father, F. C. Shillig, had provided the death certificate information including her father and mother’s names and birthplaces that matched known facts. Another good instance of using Ancestry trees as clues to be verified.

 

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Copyright 2013-2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

 
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Tombstone Tuesday: Edson Benjamin and Martha Jennie Slade

1901_BENJAMIN_Edson_Martha Jennie Slade-headstone_odd Fellows cem_The Dalles_OR_FAG_permission
Headstone of Martha “Jennie” Slade (1865-1927) and Edson Benjamin (1863-1901). Click to enlarge.

Edson Benjamin was the son of Jonathan Felix Benjamin(1838-1913) and Hannah E. Marple (1842-1900). He was a first cousin to our Hannah Melissa Benjamin (1854-1932), who married Frederick Asbury “F. A.” McMurray.

If you are a F. A. McMurray descendant, Edson is a distant cousin. How distant? Edson’s father, Jonathan Felix, was the brother of Hannah’s father, Sylvanus Rufus Benjamin (1821-1892). He was Dr. E. A. McMurray’s First Cousin Twice Removed, because E. A. was the direct descendant of a first cousin, but two generations distant.

To calculate your own relationship to Edson, count the number of generations you are from Dr. McMurray, add that to 2, and that will show how many times removed you are from a first cousin to Edson. For example, if you are a grandchild of Dr. McMurray, you are 2 generations from The Doctor, thus a first cousin 2+2= 4 times removed.

Why research distant relatives?  The ‘FAN Club’, or “Friends, Associates, Neighbors” can help us find information about our own relatives when they are mentioned in other obituaries, biographies, newspaper articles, etc. We all share some of the same DNA too, so learning more about distant rellies can tell us a bit more about ourselves, in addition to more about the family members who came before.

Edson and Jennie’s tombstone is in the Odd Fellow’s Cemetery in The Dalles, Wasco County, Oregon, USA.

More of Edson’s sad story in another post.

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Using a chart is an easy way to determine relationships. You will need to know your common ancestor, which in this case is Jonathan N. Benjamin (1799-1876), the father of Jonathan Felix and Sylvanus Rufus Benjamin. Just Google “Genealogy Relationship Charts” for dozens of examples, or use the About.com Genealogy Relationship Chart. If you have an Ancestry.com membership, under the person’s name will be “View relationship to me.” If you are the home person in the tree, clicking here will give you the relationship without having to use a chart.

2) “Rellies” is an affectionate term used by family historians to describe their relatives.

 

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Copyright 2013-2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

 
We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post, and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.

Five Family Photos for Friday- A Green Family Photo Album

This entry is part 8 of 7 in the series A Green Family Photo Album

 

 

How about these HATS??!!??

 

Green Family Photo Album- page 18.
Green Family Photo Album- page 18.

The young man in the center two pictures along the sides may be Herman Green.

Green Family Photo Album- page 11
Green Family Photo Album- page 11

Bottom row, second from right is Estelle Stampfer with maybe Charlie Ledwidge? (They married in 1904.)

Green Family Photo Album- page 29.
Green Family Photo Album- page 29.

In the picture on the upper right, the man standing on the left is probably Sam Stampfer. The woman sitting in front of him may be Ann Green. (The woman looks a lot like Rose (Brave) Green, her mother, but this is probably the daughter because of her age in ~1901.)

Green Family Photo Album- page 26.
Green Family Photo Album- page 26.

Closeup of Bess Dorothy Green in a wonderful hat.

Green Family Photo Album- page 10.
Green Family Photo Album- page 10.

We thought the young woman on the left was Bess Dorothy Green, but because we have noticed another woman who looks very similar, this needs to be confirmed.