image_pdfimage_print

Tombstone Tuesday- Israel I. COOPER and Bessie F. (MYER) COOPER

Israel I. COOPER- Headstone- Hebrew. From Find A Grave, posted with permission of photographer.
Israel I. COOPER- Headstone- Hebrew. From Find A Grave, posted with permission of photographer.

The headstone of Israel I. Cooper in Franklin Street Cemetery, Elmira, Chemung, New York, USA took a very long time to find- many years. Finding the burial place of Israel and his wife Bessie was a wonderful collaboration of family, a local library, interested volunteers that aren’t even related, Find A Grave, and those who own the cemetery.

Israel I. COOPER- Headstone- English. From Find A Grave, posted with permission of photographer.
Israel I. COOPER- Headstone- English. From Find A Grave, posted with permission of photographer.

It is a peaceful feeling to know where ancestors are “quietly resting.”

Israel Cooper belonged to the Modern Woodmen of America. They are (still) a fraternal insurance society that also provides fellowship and service through their many chapters throughout the country. The following was in an Elmira newspaper on 24 Jul 1904:

Modern Woodmen Tribute to Israel. I. Cooper. Elmira gazette, 24 Jul 1904.
Modern Woodmen Tribute to Israel. I. Cooper. Elmira Telegram, 24 Jul 1904.

 

Bessie lived 28 years after Israel’s death, living with their daughter and son at various times. She died at the home of their son, Joseph Cooper, at Montgomery, Lycoming, PA, on Saturday, 28 May, 1932, at 1 o’clock, per her obituary that was published in the Elmira Gazette on 29 May 1932. The obituary states that she was a former resident of Elmira for 35 years. She was survived by 4 daughters: Mrs. Harry Tatelbaum and Mrs. Israel Kremer of Rochester, NY; Mrs. Joseph Oppenheim of Elmira; Mrs. Samuel Blostein of Worcester, MA; and 3 sons: Joseph Cooper of Montgomery, PA; Joseph B. Cooper (should be Jacob B. Cooper) also of Montgomery, PA; and Samuel Cooper of New Haven, CT. She had 27 grandchildren at her death, and 8 great grandchildren. The funeral took place at her son Jacob Cooper’s home at 165 Washington St, Elmira, on Sunday at 2 pm.

Bessie F. (Meyer) Cooper- Headstone- Hebrew Inscription. Posted with permission of Find A Grave photographer.
Bessie F. (MEYER) COOPER- Headstone- Hebrew Inscription. Posted with permission of Find A Grave photographer.

 

Bessie F. (Meyer) Cooper- Headstone- English inscription- Franklin Street Cemetery, Elmira, Chemung, New York, USA. Posted with permission of Find A Grave photographer.
Bessie F. (MEYER) COOPER- Headstone- English inscription- Franklin Street Cemetery, Elmira, Chemung, New York, USA. Posted with permission of Find A Grave photographer.

 

It would be nice to have the Hebrew section of their headstones translated.

Israel I. COOPER- Headstone_Hebrew Detail
Israel I. COOPER- Headstone_Hebrew Detail
Bessie F. (MYER) COOPER- Headstone_Hebrew Detail
Bessie F. (MYER) COOPER- Headstone_Hebrew Detail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click to enlarge any image.

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images.

Copyright 2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

 

Silly Sunday- Broida Family in Swimsuits c1910?

John & Fannie Broida at the Beach, probably after 1904.
John & Fannie Broida at the Beach, probably after 1904. (Click to enlarge.)

 

Our last post with silly swimsuits was such a hit ( See Silly Sunday- Joseph Cooper Family in Swimsuits c1912)  that we thought we would share yet another high-fashion image to whet your appetite for the coming swimsuit season. At least with these swimsuits, one didn’t have to diet quite as much before the season started!

This image is of John Zelig Broida (1857-1938) and his second wife, Fannie. Her maiden name is unknown, but they married in 1904, when Fannie was 29 and John 47 years old. They lived in Pittsburgh, PA, and St. Louis, Missouri until their emigration to Palestine in September, 1920. John/Zelig died in Palestine, but we still don’t know much about Fannie and what happened to her.

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Broida family photos

2) Family oral history

Please contact us if you would like a higher resolution image.

Copyright 2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post, and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.

 

Helbling Family Home & School, Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania, Part 1

This entry is part 1 of 3 in the series Helbling Family Home & School

 

Helbling family home in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania. From a family photo but image may also be found in St. Augustine Diamond Jubilee, page 40-2, St. Augustine Catholic Church, Lawrenceville, PA. From a family photo but image may also be found in St. Augustine Diamond Jubilee, page 40-2, St. Augustine Catholic Church, Lawrenceville, PA.
Helbling family home in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania.
From a family photo but image may also be found in St. Augustine Diamond Jubilee, page 40-2, St. Augustine Catholic Church, Lawrenceville, PA.

In the year 1854, the Franz Xavier and Maria Barbara (Helbling) Helbling home was across from the Allegheny Cemetery and halfway between Sharpsburg and St. Philomena’s Roman Catholic Church. The Redemptionist Fathers of St. Philomena’s often stopped at the home of the devout Helbling family when traveling between the Church on Fourteenth St. and Sharpsburg. (The home was still standing in the 1930s, but 4807-4809 Butler St., Lawrenceville, PA, is now an empty lot.) German Catholics were very devoted to parochial schools- they felt their children should start their day with a Mass and that they should be schooled in a Catholic school. The Helblings had eleven children, and there were many more children of German Catholic families in the town of Lawrenceville, PA, near Pittsburgh which was rapidly becoming an important industrial city.

The Helbling children attended the English-speaking school at St. Philomena’s on 46th St., but it was quite a long way to travel. Father John Hotz, C.SS.R. visited the Helblings at their home in the fall of 1854, and asked if the Helblings would board a teacher who could instruct their children. A schoolroom was set up on the second floor of the double house, and the teacher arrived.

 

Nine of the Helbling children attended school with this teacher: Elizabeth Barbara, Francis X., William, Philomena Rosanna, Catherine Josephine, Mary Sophia, John Baptist, and Joseph Anthony Helbling; sometimes Bertha Louise, just 2 or 3, attended class. The teacher was very stern and strange, only left the house on Sundays to go to Mass, and wore a long black robe but was not actually a priest. (He may have been a Redemptorist lay brother but no information has confirmed this.) He prayed to a picture of Our Lady of Guadeloupe constantly. The story told is that when, one day, Mrs. Helbling sent little daughter Bertha Louise to get some corn cobs from the yard, the child returned with them and said, “I got them.” The teacher, not being very fluent in English, thought that the child had said a curse word, and said, “Bertha Louise is surely going to hell.”

The adults in the family soon began to question the eccentric behavior of this teacher that their children greatly disliked and feared. The family never even knew his name- he was always just addressed as “Teacher.” As a mother, Mary Theresa (Knipshield) Helbling feared for her children that the teacher was about to lose his mind, and asked Father Hotz to dismiss him from their school and home. Fr. Hotz transferred the teacher to a school in Sharpsburg, where he did in fact lose his mind and have to be removed. Nothing further is known of him.

To be continued…

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) St. Augustine’s Parish History 1863-1938. Personal copy from a cousin, but the entire history may be found online at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~njm1/StAugJub-TC.html, page 11. Accessed 1-22-2014.

Please contact us if you would like a higher resolution image.

Copyright 2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

 
We would love to read your thoughts and comments about this post, and thank you for your time! All comments are moderated, however, due to the high intelligence and persistence of spammers/hackers who really should be putting their smarts to use for the public good instead of spamming our little blog.

Researching Photographers in Pittsburgh, PA: R. D. Cochran

"Old Cochran" in Directory of Pittsburgh and Allegheny cities, 1862-1863, p. 52.
“Old Cochran” in Directory of Pittsburgh and Allegheny cities, 1862-1863, p. 52.

This entry in a Pittsburgh City Directory made me stop and think about how tough life was back in the day- today too, but even fewer safety nets then like Social Security or food stamps. Manual labor was the only job available for many throughout their lifetime. Poor “Old Cochran”- not even known by his first name, just his age- was still working as a laborer at that point in his life. Still living on his own maybe, but sadly I did not notice other Cochrans nearby on his street. A daughter may have been nearby but we wouldn’t know because she, if even listed, would be under her husband’s name.

OK, that was another Heritage Rambling… on to the topic at hand.

Logo of Cochran [Photography Studio] in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, c1895.
Logo of Cochran [Photography Studio] in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, c1895. (Front)
I came upon the “Old Cochran” entry while looking for a R. D. Cochran, Artistic Photographer in Pittsburgh. Old City Directories are a great way to find family, friends, associates, and neighbors (the “FAN Club”), as well as nearby businesses, for those from times long gone. I have been trying to find a date for the photos discussed in this week’s “Mystery Monday” post:

http://heritageramblings.net/2014/01/20/mystery-monday…-golumb-family/

Since we have a photographer’s name/studio listed on the portraits, finding when the photographer was in business would help to narrow the date range of the photos. Unfortunately, Pittsburgh, PA does not have a listing of photographers (some other cities do have lists that family historians or archivists have compiled). The knowledgeable folks on the Allegheny County, Pennsylvania RootsWeb group suggested  that I search the many City Directories online for Pittsburgh at http://digital.library.pitt.edu/cgi-bin/t/text/text-idx?c=pitttextdir;page=browse;key=date

GOLOMB Family? Pittsburgh PA, c1895? RD Cochran, Photographer- Reverse
GOLOMB Family? Pittsburgh PA, c1895? RD Cochran, Photographer- Reverse (Click to enlarge or for a sharper image.)

There is a search function on the page so I put in “R. D. Cochran” and got 16 hits. I had previously seen a photo of an African-American Civil War soldier posted online that was taken by R. D. Cochran (similar design on the advertisement), so checked the early directories first. My results:

Title: Directory of Pittsburgh and Allegheny cities, 1863
Publication Info: Pittsburgh, Pa.]: G.H. Thurston, 1863, p. 58

“Cochran, Robert D., of R D Cochran & Co., n Woods’ Run”

Title: Directory of Pittsburgh and Allegheny cities, 1865-1866, Pittsburgh, PA: G.H. Thurston, 1865
Collection: Historic Pittsburgh City Directories, p.80

“Cochran R. D., of R. D. Cochran & Co., McClure tp”

Title: Directory of Pittsburgh and Allegheny cities, 1867
Publication Info: Pittsburgh, Pa.]: G.H. Thurston, 1867, p.96

“Cochran R. D. of R. D. Cochran & Co. McClure tp”

Title: Directory of Pittsburgh and Allegheny cities, 1869-1870
Publication Info: Pittsburgh, Pa.]: G.H. Thurston, 1869, p.100

“Cochran R. D., of R. D. Cochran & Co., res McClure tp”

There are other R. D. Cochrans listed for many later years, mostly in the oil business. I was unable to find the studio listed in the business section of the city directory, but often a business would be required to pay for the privilege of being listed under “Photographers” in the directory, and many were not able to afford the advertising.

So if “R. D. Cochran & Co.” was a photography studio, we may have narrowed the date of the photos. Probably not though, as the Green and Golumb families did not immigrate to the United States until the 1880s, so the time frame is not correct for our image.

I did a US Federal Census search for R. D. Cochran, and found a Robert D. Cochran listed as a steamboat captain in the 1860 census for McCluer Twp, Allegheny, PA- so that might be the “R. D. Cochran & Co” I found in the City Directory in that same township. I searched through other censuses in Allegheny Co. for our photographer, but little luck in finding him or her.

We definitely need more information.

Probably the next step is dating the photos by clothing, hairstyles, and props. There are a number of books available to use for this research, so those will be bedtime reading this week. I also have an email out to a  person who includes the Golomb family on their tree, though they have not posted any photos. But I am really hoping that a cousin will see these photos and remember they have an acid-free storage box with the same photos, with individuals positively identified on them in archival ink. (A family historian’s dream…)

As always, suggestions are appreciated.

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) “Old Cochran- lab” may be found in the Directory of Pittsburgh and Allegheny cities, 1862-1863, p.52, Collection: Historic Pittsburgh City Directories at

http://digital.library.pitt.edu/cgi-bin/t/text/pageviewer-idx?c=pitttextdir;cc=pitttextdir;idno=31735038289116;node=31735038289116%3A1.8;frm=frameset;view=image;seq=72;page=root;size=s

Accessed 1/18/2014.

2) The “FAN Club” is a way to help break through brick walls. By researching Friends, Associates, and Neighbors, you may find something about the ancestor you seek. I wish I could give credit to the researcher who originated the acronym, but do not know who came up with it as a quick way to explain what experienced genealogists have been doing for a long time. Researching siblings is another way to break through brick walls- especially helpful if one of the siblings had an unusual name whereas your direct ancestor might have had a common name. Siblings are often listed in obituaries, parent’s names may be on birth or death records, etc.

3) The Allegheny County, PA RootsWeb List: http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/index/PAALLEGH

The Allegheny County, PA RootsWebWebsite: http://www.pagenweb.org/~allegheny/index.htm

4) African-American Civil War soldier- Cabinet Card  found at http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/cabinet-card-african-american-soldier . Accessed 1/17/2014.

5) Robert D. Cochran: Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: McClure, Allegheny,Pennsylvania; Roll: M653_1065; Page: 379; Image: 386; Family History Library Film: 805065. Accessed on Ancestry.com 1/18/2014.

 

Please contact us if you would like a higher resolution image. Image may be enlarged by clicking on it.

Copyright 2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.

Mystery Monday- Green or Golumb Family?

Unknown Children- Green or Cooper Family? Photo taken by R.D. Cochran, "Artistic Photographer" in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Standing: Ann Green, Herman Green sitting on left, Bess Green sitting on right. Photo taken by R.D. Cochran, “Artistic Photographer” in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

 

Here are more delightful family pictures, but which family??? And are the photos related, other than being taken at the same photo studio? I answered part of my own questions by working on my FSLOW New Year’s resolution- Find it, Scan it, Label it, Organize it, and Write about it.

This group of photos was in with family treasures from the Green and Cooper families. I have just found notes from 30 years ago that identify the above picture as three of the children of Abraham and Rose (Brave) Green: Ann, Herman, and Bess, taken circa 1895. But why isn’t Estelle, child #2, in the picture with children #1, 3,4?

The back of the photos is charming:

Reverse of photo- Unknown People in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Reverse of photo- Unknown People in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

I especially love the line: “Instantaneous Portraits of Children a successful Specialty.”

Here are two more photos with the same backing:

Unknown Couple with Baby- Green or Cooper Family? Photo taken by R.D. Cochran, "Artistic Photographer" in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Unknown Couple with Baby- Golumb Family? Photo taken by R.D. Cochran, “Artistic Photographer” in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Unknown Girls- Green or Cooper Family? Photo taken by R.D. Cochran, "Artistic Photographer" in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Unknown Girls- Green or Golumb Family? Photo taken by R.D. Cochran, “Artistic Photographer” in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

These last two photos appear to have been taken at the same place, possibly at the same time- note the chairs. Thirty year-old notes also ask the question- ?Golumb Family? for the image with the couple and baby- no hints for the picture of the two girls.

Could the two girls possibly be the same ones as in in the photo of the three children? Note the long fingers of the older girl in both, and the shorter, wider hands of the younger girl. To me, their facial features are somewhat similar in the other picture, just more mature.

Some old notes from family oral history state the girls in the last photo may be Estelle Green and Ann Green.

Ann Green was born 1885 in Lithuania, and Estelle on board the ship in 1887 that carried her mother and 1 year-old sister Ann to America. Abraham had immigrated ahead of them, as was often done, probably in 1886, and he had established his tailor business before sending for his family. Their next known baby is Bess Dorothy Green- she was born in 1891 in Pittsburgh. One thought was that the baby in the picture with the couple could be Bessie, but the couple just doesn’t look like I think Abraham and Rose would have looked when young, comparing other pictures. And it is strange to only have some of the children in the first and last picture- that would have been fairly unusual.

Another possibility is that the pictures are of the Golumb Family. Sarah Rebecca Green, sister of Abraham, married Louis Golumb (also Louis Golomb, Lewis Golumb, or Lewis Golomb, dear Google search engine), and they lived in Pittsburgh. In the 1900 US Federal Census, Lewis Golumb and Sarah were living with their 4 children, Esther, Rosie, Bessie, and Isadore, born 1894, 1896, 1897, 1899, respectively. Lewis was a painter and paperhanger and had been born in Poland/Russia like his wife. Censuses vary in when each arrived, but the 1900 census states they had been married for 7 years. Could these be photos Sarah sent back to her brother in St. Louis? If so, and again, why only some of the children, not all?

Here is a picture of Sarah Rebecca Green- well, the family thinks it is Sarah:

Probably Sarah Rebecca (Green) Golumb.
Probably Sarah Rebecca (Green) Golumb.

Does she look like a younger version of the woman in the photo with the baby? To me her face is too thin to be the same woman.

So there’s your mystery for today.

I am currently trying to find out when R.D. Cochran had the Pittsburgh “Artistic” photography studio, and that may help to confirm the date of these photos. Looks like we also need to learn when  the Fischer Studio was active in St. Louis, Missouri.

Any other information or ideas would be much appreciated.

 

 

Notes, Sources, and References:

1) Family oral history.

2) Family photo collection with identification on a very few.

3) Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Pittsburgh Ward 8, Allegheny, Pennsylvania; Roll: 1358; Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 0129; FHL microfilm: 1241358. Accessed on Ancestry.com on 1/17/2014.

 

 

Click images to enlarge.

Please contact us if you would like higher resolution images.

Copyright 2014 by Heritage Ramblings Blog and pmm.